Along The Backbone

by Dr. Matthew Bonnan, Ph.D. · · · CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 · 1 subscribers

Paleobiologist Dr. Matthew Bonnan explores the evolution of vertebrate anatomy, from bones to brains, through deep time.

Episode 8: Face the Face Feb. 17, 2012

Of all the vertebrate animals, only mammals have muscles of facial expression ... why?

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Tags: time, comparative, biological, education, development, developmental, evolution, evolutionary, natural sciences, geology, science & medicine/natural sciences, science, science & medicine, vertebrate, biology, deep, anatomy

Older Episodes

Episode 8: Face the Face Feb. 17, 2012
Of all the vertebrate animals, only mammals have muscles of facial expression ... why?
The ability to open doors depends on two things: 1) being able to grip the door handle and 2) being able to rotate the hand so that the door handle turns. Could a hungry Velociraptor turn a door handle to get at you, the delectable human in hiding?
The ability to open doors depends on two things: 1) being able to grip the door handle and 2) being able to rotate the hand so that the door handle turns. Could a hungry Velociraptor turn a door handle to get at you, the delectable human in hiding?
Why don't mammals continuously replace their teeth? The answer may surprise you.
Why don't mammals continuously replace their teeth? The answer may surprise you.
Having upright limbs has advantages for mammals. And you probably want to know about how an elephant almost made Dr. Bonnan thinner.
Having upright limbs has advantages for mammals. And you probably want to know about how an elephant almost made Dr. Bonnan thinner.
Many of us enjoy eating meat, but few of us pause to think about how important its pre-meal form, skeletal muscle, is for vertebrate life.
Many of us enjoy eating meat, but few of us pause to think about how important its pre-meal form, skeletal muscle, is for vertebrate life.
It seems only fitting that a podcast series called Along the Backbone should discuss the formation of the backbone in one of lengthiest vertebrates: snakes.
It seems only fitting that a podcast series called Along the Backbone should discuss the formation of the backbone in one of lengthiest vertebrates: snakes.
When we talk about reconstructing the vertebrate family tree, we are also trying to develop a pedigree of relationships. This pedigree, in turn, helps us understand how anatomical changes have taken place over time.![](http://sta ts.wordpress.com/b.gif?host=alongthebackbone.wordpress.com&blog=28199126&post= 48&subd=alongthebackbone&ref=&feed=1)