Democracy Now! Blog

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Democracy Now! Blog

12 de abril de 2013 Amy Goodman WikiLeaks acaba de publicar una nueva serie de documentos. Se trata de más de 1,7 millones de cables del Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos pertenecientes al período 1973-1976, denominados “Los cables de Kissinger”, en referencia a Henry Kissinger, el entonces Secretario de …
Lawyers representing hunger-striking detainees at Guantánamo Bay have warned some of the protesters could soon die in the ongoing protest. Lawyers for the men estimate that of the 166 still indefinitely detained at Guantánamo, nearly all are on hunger strike. On Wednesday, 25 legal and human rights organizations signed an …
El mundo en 5 minutos April 12, 2013
Para más información acerca de lo que pasó en el mundo en esta semana, visita nuestro Resumen Semanal - Miles de personas marchan por una reforma inmigratoria en Estados Unidos Decenas de miles de inmigrantes de todo el país se unieron al movimiento obrero y otros aliados el miércoles para …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan WikiLeaks has released a new trove of documents, more than 1.7 million U.S. State Department cables dating from 1973-1976, which they have dubbed “The Kissinger Cables,” after Henry Kissinger, who in those years served as secretary of state and assistant to the president for …
Part two of our interview with Amira Hass, the only Jewish-Israeli journalist to have spent almost 20 years living in and reporting from Gaza and the West Bank. Christiane Amanpour has described her as "one of the greatest truth- seekers of them all." Amira Hass recently suffered a torrent of …
As efforts grow to target activists who expose animal abuse, we speak to Andrew Stepanian, who was sentenced to three years in prison in 2006 for violating a controversial law known as the Animal Enterprise Protection Act. Stepanian and several others were jailed for their role in a campaign to …
In part two of our conversation, Icelandic Parliamentarian Birgitta Jónsdóttir talks about why she decided to come to the United States at a time when a grand jury in Alexandria, Virginia, is investigating WikiLeaks and Julian Assange. Jonsdottir, a former WikiLeaks volunteer, also talks about her support for whistleblower Bradley …
Forty years ago, on March 29, 1973, the "secret" U.S. bombing that devastated Laos came to an end. By that point, the United States had dropped at least two million tons of bombs on Laos. That is the equivalent of one planeload every eight minutes, 24 hours a day, for …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan New federal gun-control legislation has been declared all but dead on arrival this week. Gridlock in the U.S. Senate, where a super-majority of 60 votes is needed to move most legislation these days, is proving to be an insuperable barrier to any meaningful change …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about same-sex marriage this week. On Tuesday, it was about the controversial California ballot initiative known as Prop 8, which has banned same-sex marriages in that state. On Wednesday, the case challenging the constitutionality of DOMA , the …
In our extended discussion with Cheryl Wills, NY1 anchor and author of Die Free: A Heroic Family Tale, she discusses the legacy of slavery and the impact of Nigerian literary icon Chinua Achebe on African Americans' pride in their history. We also play an excerpt of Morgan Freeman reading the …
Watch a 2012 interview Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman did with Mikel Lezamiz, director of Cooperative Dissemination at the Mondragon Cooperative Corporation in Spain's Basque Country. He described how the project relies on a participatory model in which the workers are the cooperative's members. AMY GOODMAN : This is Democracy …
In this extended interview with Richard Wolff, he discusses how his parents fled Hitler and immigrated to the United States from Germany during World War II, and their influence on his worldview. "I grew up convinced that understanding the political and economic environment I lived in was an urgent matter …
We continue our interview with Iraq War veteran Tomas Young. Citing his overwhelming physical pain from wounds that left him paralyzed in Iraq, Young recently announced he has decided to end his life by discontinuing his medicine and nourishment, which comes in the form of liquid through a feeding tube. …
Paralyzed in a 2004 attack in Sadr City, Iraq War veteran Tomas Young recently announced that he will stop his medicine and nourishment, which comes in the form of liquid through a feeding tube -- a decision which will hasten his death. Joining us from his home in Kansas City, …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan Tomas Young was in the fifth day of his first deployment to Iraq when he was struck by a sniper’s bullet in Baghdad’s Sadr City. The single bullet paralyzed him from the chest down, and changed his life forever. Now, nine years later, at …
As we continue our conversation with Rashid Khalidi, the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University, he explains the thesis of his latest book, Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East . Click here to see part one of this interview. AMY …
See Charlie Rose interview Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman about growing opposition in the United States and abroad to a possible war in Iraq. The show originally aired on March 12, 2003. Goodman wrote about the interview in the chapter, "Educating Charlie Rose," in her book, Exception To The Rulers. …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan You could say that a filibuster occurs when a senator drones on and on. The problem with the U.S. Senate was that there were too few senators speaking about drones this week. President Barack Obama’s controversial nomination of John Brennan as director of the …
By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan Albert Woodfox has been in solitary confinement for 40 years, most of that time locked up in the notorious maximum-security Louisiana State Penitentiary known as “Angola.” This week, after his lawyers spent six years arguing that racial bias tainted the grand- jury selection in …