Inquiring Minds

by Indre Viskontas & Kishore Hari (adam@adamisaak.com) · · · · 31 subscribers

Each week Inquiring Minds brings you a new, in-depth exploration of the place where science, politics, and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We endeavor to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters with weekly coverage of the latest headlines and probing discussions with leading scientists and thinkers. Produced by Adam Isaak in partnership with Climate Desk, a journalistic collaboration dedicated to exploring the impact of a changing climate and consisting of The Atlantic, Center for Investigative Reporting, Grist, The Guardian, The Huffington Post, Mother Jones, Slate, and Wired.

We talk to science writer David Quammen about his new book The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life.

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Tags: science, science & medicine, minds, social sciences, society, politics, inquiring, science & medicine/social sciences

Older Episodes

We talk to Arnold Van de Laar, a surgeon in the Slotervaart Hospital in Amsterdam, about his new book Under the Knife: A History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations.
This week: We recap the 2018 Nobel Prizes and look at a study exploring a new way to use electrical stimulation to regenerate nerves.
We talk to mathematician and science writer Hannah Fry about her latest book Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms.
We talk to artificial intelligence expert and former president of Google China Kai-Fu Lee about his recent book AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order.
We talk with cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker about his recent book Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.
The Coyote Story Sept. 19, 2018
We talk to writer and historian Dan Flores about his book Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History.
This week: Kishore takes a closer look at some of the health claims made during the recent Apple Keynote.
We talk to celebrated science journalist Richard Harris about the “reproducibility crisis” in science and his new book Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions.
We talk to political scientist Eric Oliver about the surprisingly high percentage of people who believe in conspiracy theories and the reasons behind those beliefs. His forthcoming book is Enchanted America: How Intuition and Reason Divide Our Politics.
This week: A new study shows we only focus on something a few milliseconds at a time, but we don’t notice because we’re pulsing that focus; and research on how ants avoid traffic jams so perfectly. Thanks to guest co-host Trace Dominguez!
We talk to author Andrea J. Buchanan about her experience with a brain injury and how she used playing the piano to recover. Buchanan’s new book is The Beginning of Everything: The Year I Lost My Mind and Found Myself.
This week: A jury decided that Monsanto’s Roundup caused a man’s cancer but the science is murky and a new study shows that children are susceptible to peer pressure by robots. Links: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-monsanto- cancer-lawsuit/monsanto-or
We talk to chemist Joseph Meany about his book Graphene: The Superstrong, Superthin, and Superversatile Material That Will Revolutionize the World.
This week: A Standford study used Google Glass to help kids with autism understand others people’s emotions; and breaking news regarding the way dogs pee. Links: http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2018/08/google-glass-helps- kids-with-autism-read
This week: A new study from the University of Bristol showing the way plants accumulate sugar helps them tell what time it is; scientists have successfully transplanted lab-grown lungs into pigs; and Caucher Birkar was awarded the Fields Medal—and then i
Ben Goldfarb is a writer covering wildlife conservation and fisheries management. We talk to him about his new book Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter.
This week: Italian scientists found a body of liquid water on mars using radar; a new study suggests that while dogs do feel empathy for us, training them to be therapy dogs doesn’t make them care more, it makes them more obedient; and research shows tha
We talk to Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the pediatrician who first proved that Flint’s kids were exposed to lead about her new book What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City. Links: https://inquiring.show/episo