Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 01.10.2011 Oct. 1, 2011

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Germany approves an extended EU rescue fund - Why the next generation of European leaders are pessimistic about the future - The Czech Republic bucks Europe's anti-nuclear trend - Turkish doctors cure intensive care patients with music - An Italian goes on hunger strike until all the country's politicians have been sacked - Why foie gras is off the menu at the world's largest food fair.Germany gives green light to extended EU rescue fundThe German parliament this week approved plans to increase the country's contribution to the eurozone bailout fund to 211 billion euros. Earlier in the week, the lender ...



Germany approves an extended EU rescue fund - Why the next generation of European leaders are pessimistic about the future - The Czech Republic bucks Europe's anti-nuclear trend - Turkish doctors cure intensive care patients with music - An Italian goes on hunger strike until all the country's politicians have been sacked - Why foie gras is off the menu at the world's largest food fair.Germany gives green light to extended EU rescue fundThe German parliament this week approved plans to increase the country's contribution to the eurozone bailout fund to 211 billion euros. Earlier in the week, the lender and the borrower came together in Berlin.German Chancellor Angela Merkel met her Greek counterpart, George Papandreou. He came to Berlin to reassure his country's creditors that Greece is on course to cut its deficit and is not wasting German taxpayers' cash. His plea for more money seems to have been heard, but as Stephen Beard reports from Berlin, the Germans are showing clear signs of bailout fatigue.Pessimism grows among the next generation of European leadersEU officials are constantly cranking out proposals to try to deal with the eurozone crisis, such as a financial transaction tax and Eurobonds. Many of those officials are graduates from the College of Europe, which lies some 200 kilometres north west of Brussels.It was created to promote a European identity and spirit among its students. Famous alumni include British deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and the new Danish Prime Minister. But as Vanessa Mock found out, the class of 2011 is less than confident about Europe's future.How the Czech Republic is bucking Europe's anti-nuclear trendThe euro crisis has pushed the other hot topic of the year in Europe down the news agenda recently – the question of energy supply. But six months on from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan and the shockwaves – if that's the right word – are still being felt in Europe.Germany has announced it will shut down all of its nuclear plants by 2022. Non-nuclear Austria wants to ban the import of nuclear-generated power from 2015. But in the Czech Republic, the talk is of maintaining and even expanding nuclear power, setting the country on a collision course with its neighbours. Rob Cameron has this report.Turkish doctors cure intensive care patients with musicThe sound of the makam - a distinctive musical composition form unique to classic Arabic and Turkish music – is a predominant part of a 1,000 year-old medical treatment: Music therapy.Now, in one of Turkey's most modern hospitals, the Memorial in Istanbul, leading practitioners have been pioneering this as a complementary treatment to lower heart rates and blood pressure. Dorian Jones went to visit them and has this report.Putin set for another crack at the Russian presidencyAt a recent congress of the ruling United Russia party, Prime Minster Vladimir Putin announced that he would be swapping roles with current President Dmitry Medvedev – provided of course both are successful in the respective elections.Leaked US cables likened the pair to Batman and Robin or Putin to Cardinal Richelieu, with Medvedev cast in the role of Louis XIII. Either way, the annouincement at the party congress paved the way for Putin to potentially remain at the helm of Russian politics until 2024. Geert Groot Koerkamp has more from Moscow.Will the French give Strauss-Kahn another chance?The potential return of Dominique Strauss-Kahn to French politics may not have provoked street demonstrations, but it has certainly been a controversial topic ever since allegations of sexual assault led to his demise as head of the International Monetary Fund.Now cleared of criminal charges, Strauss-Kahn is trying to get a civil action by the maid he was accused of raping, thrown out as well. But it may not be enough to convince the French to give him another chance. Eleanor Beardsley has this report from Paris.Hungering for a change of leadership in ItalyWith their Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi mired in a range of scandals, Italians also seem unconvinced their political leaders are up to the task of dragging the country out of its economic dire straits. And one man in particular has reached the end of his tether.Gaitano Ferrieri has been holding a hunger strike in front of the Italian parliament since June. He and supporters say they will remain camped out there until not just Berlusconi but all of Italy's parliamentarians have resigned. Megan Williams has the story from Rome Why foie gras is off the menu at the world's largest food fairFoie gras - the French delicacy that gets gourmets salivating, and animal rights campaigners foaming at the mouth. The method of force-feeding geese to produce a rich-tasting liver pate has long been the source of much controversy.So much so, that Anuga, the world's largest food and beverage trade fair has banned the product from this year’s exhibition, which opens next week in Cologne, here in Germany. Around 6,500 exhibitors will be presenting their ideas, inspirations and innovations to around 150,000 visitors. Earlier, Rob Turner asked Peter Grothues, the vice-president of Food at Cologne's trade fair, why foie gras won't be on the menu this year.Georgia toasts a bright future for its ancient wine industryBack in 2006 Russia imposed an import ban on wine from Georgia. The embargo wiped out roughly 80 percent of Georgian winemakers' export market. Five years later, Russia has hinted it's prepared to lift the ban as it moves closer to becoming a member of the World Trade Organization.That's good news for many Georgian winemakers – but it's also a worry for those who spent the last five years developing new markets elsewhere. Our correspondent Mareike Aden has more from the Georgian wine region of Kakhetia.