Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 15.10.2011 Oct. 15, 2011

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Germans count the cost of Europe's economic crisis - The debt crisis becomes a health hazard for Greeks - Expat Greeks are tired of the blame game - Italian psychologists take the couch to the street - A proposal that would help organ donors rest in peace in the UK - Latvia cooks up new school menus to tackle obesity - Eating like stone age man in Berlin - Harris tweed makes a comeback.Germans count the cost of Europe's economic crisisAll eyes were on Slovakia this week - the last country to vote on the ratification of a new eurozone ...



Germans count the cost of Europe's economic crisis - The debt crisis becomes a health hazard for Greeks - Expat Greeks are tired of the blame game - Italian psychologists take the couch to the street - A proposal that would help organ donors rest in peace in the UK - Latvia cooks up new school menus to tackle obesity - Eating like stone age man in Berlin - Harris tweed makes a comeback.Germans count the cost of Europe's economic crisisAll eyes were on Slovakia this week - the last country to vote on the ratification of a new eurozone bailout fund or EFSF. The EFSF was created to shore up distressed nations after the eurozone bailed out Greece in May last year. Its lending capacity is currently 250 billion euros. But that's no longer enough to get Europe's debt crisis under control.Once the ratification process is complete, the fund will be expanded to 440 billion euros. Germany has been a key player in proping up unstable eurozone economies. But according to a recent poll, 80% of Germans are against any further bailouts. However Germany may have little choice because the country has too much to lose if the euro collapses. Stephen Beard has this report from Berlin.Debt crisis fuels euroscepticism in the UKIn Britain the eurozone crisis has led to renewed calls for a referendum on whether the country should remain in the European Union.A loud chorus of euroscepticism has emerged among right-wing thinkers and politicians who believe the euro has always been doomed as a currency - and that Britain would be better off out of the EU. Olly Barratt reports from London.Expat Greeks are tired of the blame gameGermany is home to around 300,000 Greeks. Many of them arrived here during the 1960s and 70s. The debt crisis back in Greece has left many of them feeling torn.They're aware that many Germans are resentful of having to foot the bill for Greece's failure to keep its books in order. But on the other hand they feel that the austerity measures imposed on Athens – which have been spearheaded by Germany - are too harsh. Caitlin Carroll has been talking to members of the Greek community in Berlin.The debt crisis becomes a health hazard for GreeksAccording to a new report, there's been a rise in suicides, murders, HIV infection and other illnesses since Greece plunged into debt. At the same time Greeks are losing access to health care amid dwindling budgets.Alexander Kentikelenis is with the sociology department of Cambridge University and co-authored the report. He told Helen Seeney more about this worrying trend. Italian psychologists take the couch to the streetWith all the bad news on the economic front, it's no surprise that stress levels are rising among Europeans. Italy is no exception.In an effort to help ease the stress, a small but growing trend to help those in distress is springing up in local pharmacies. Megan Williams has this report from Rome. Ukrainian court sentences Timoshenko to seven years in prisonThe former prime minister was found guilty of abusing power back in 2009 by making the state energy company sign a 10 year gas import deal with Russia that was overly advantageous to Moscow.Yulia Timoshenko has said her three month trial has been politically motivated. And both Russia and the European Union have criticized the outcome of the trial. Geert Groot Koerkamp has more.A proposal that would help organ donors rest in peace in the UKThree people in Britain die every day while waiting for an organ. The UK has a relatively low level of organ donation – only around 30 percent of the population are on the organ donor register and there are long waiting lists for kidneys, lungs, hearts and so on.Now Britain's medical ethics body has suggested a scheme of paying funeral expenses for people who donate their organs after death. The Nuffield Council of Bioethics says in a new report on the issue that the programme would be the first of its kind in the world. The Council's Director, Hugh Whittall, told Helen Seeney more.Latvia cooks up new school menus to tackle obesityLatvia is increasingly anxious about its smallest citizens. A study carried out in schools throughout the country shows that around one fifth of all the first grade pupils, especially girls, are overweight.Obesity among seven-year-old Latvian kids is becoming more and more widespread every year. That's why government officials and NGO's are now rushing to amend the rules for catering in schools. They want junk food – particularly sausages – to disappear from school menus. Ģederts Ģelzis in Riga has the details.Eating like stone age man in BerlinThe idea of eating like our distant ancestors, the hunters and gatherers of the Stone Age, is a reality. It's called a "Paleo Diet" and its modern followers claim that eating like man did before he went into agriculture has many benefits.Two young men in Berlin were so convinced of this lifestyle, they opened up Europe's first Stone Age Restaurant. It's called Sauvage which is French for "wild". Monika Hebbinghaus went along to find out what "Paleo" food is all about. Why Harris Tweed is making a comebackHarris Tweed is one of Britain's most famous materials. It's been made by inhabitants of the Isles of Harris and Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, off the north western coast of Scotland, for centuries.This year marks the 100th anniversary of the fabric's 'orb' stamp – which is the authentication label you'll find on every piece of Harris Tweed. The stamp proves that it's been dyed, spun, hand-woven and quality checked on the Isles of Harris and Lewis. Dany Mitzman travelled to the Outer Hebrides to discover how the fabric that seemed to be on the verge of extinction is now enjoying a new lease of life.