Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 29.10.2011

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· · · 1 listeners

On today's programme: 11th hour deal to contain eurozone’s debt crisis - Earthquake highlight’s Turkey’s ethnic divide - Chinese investors snap up London property - Last word in luxury takes shape in Switzerland - Scotland’s ruling party unveils bid for independence - Did Hitler die in Argentina?- Has a Roman villa fallen victim to bureaucratic bungling? - The German beer making a splash abroad. An 11th hour deal to contain the eurozone’s sovereign debt crisisEuropean Union politicians put in a lot of overtime this past week. EU leaders held not one but two summits to try to agree on a ...



On today's programme: 11th hour deal to contain eurozone’s debt crisis - Earthquake highlight’s Turkey’s ethnic divide - Chinese investors snap up London property - Last word in luxury takes shape in Switzerland - Scotland’s ruling party unveils bid for independence - Did Hitler die in Argentina?- Has a Roman villa fallen victim to bureaucratic bungling? - The German beer making a splash abroad. An 11th hour deal to contain the eurozone’s sovereign debt crisisEuropean Union politicians put in a lot of overtime this past week. EU leaders held not one but two summits to try to agree on a plan to contain the eurozone’s sovereign debt crisis and in particular to reduce Greece’s debt burden.A three-part plan was reached after the second summit – a marathon meeting in Brussels, during which talks often verged on collapse. Banks accepted to take on huge losses on Greek debt - and the EU’s bail out fund was boosted to around one trillion euros. However, much of the detail has yet to be hammered out. Vanessa Mock reports from Brussels.A devastating earthquake highlight’s Turkey’s ethnic divideLast Sunday’s earthquake in eastern Turkey left hundreds of people dead and made tens of thousands homeless. It’s also highlighted the troubled relations between Turks and Kurds.The quake happened in a predominantly Kurdish part of the country and occurred just days after the Kurdish separatist group, the PKK, killed 24 Turkish soldiers. Turkey’s armed forces responded with air and land operations in which dozens of PKK fighters were killed. The response to the earthquake has seen both a humanitarian show of support but also ugly expressions of nationalism by some Turks towards the survivors. As Dorian Jones reports the disaster is being seen as a crucial test for the country.Chinese investors snap up property in LondonIn these uncertain times, those who are lucky enough to actually have money to spend, are wondering just where to invest their hard-earned cash. Chinese investors seem to think they’ve found the answer – they’re currently snapping up London real estate.According to a recent report one-in-three buyers of newly built London homes come from China. Property developers say London offers a safe haven in the current global economic downturn. But they also hope major Chinese investment will help them finish building developments hit by cash-flow problems ever since the financial crisis first hit. Nina-Maria Potts reports from London.The last word in luxury takes shape in SwitzerlandForeign investment is set to make a difference to the tiny Swiss village of Andermatt.It’s undergoing a controversial makeover in a bid to revive its flagging rural economy. If successful, the project will turn the village into one of the most exclusive – and expensive – resorts in the world. Imogen Foulkes has the details.Can Scotland afford to go it alone?Scotland’s ruling party, the Scottish National Party, or SNP, has just ended its annual conference in buoyant mood: optimistic and riding high in the opinion polls.The SNP runs what is called a “devolved government “ within the UK. But the SNP is a separatist party. It wants Scotland to break away from Britain. And its leader, Scotland’s First Minister, Alex Salmond, says “ a break-up of the union is now as near inevitable as anything can be”. That’s bad news for the United Kingdom. But as Stephen Beard reports from Edinburgh, it may not be good for Scotland either. Did Adolf Hitler live out his last days in Argentina?On February 13, 1962 an old man died peacefully in his bed in a small remote village in Argentina. But not any old man. According to a new book, it was Adolf Hitler.The book, called Grey Wolf, claims that Hitler escaped Berlin in the final days of World War Two and, together with his wife Eva Braun fled to Argentina where they had two daughters and lived until peacefully until their deaths. Journalist Gerrard Williams co-authored the book. Chuck Penfold asked him how Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun supposedly managed to escape Berlin unnoticed.Has a Roman villa fallen victim to bureaucratic bungling?Back in 1997 a Roman villa in Sicily was designated a UNESCO heritage site. The Villa Romana del Casale dates back to the fourth century and contains the richest and largest collection of Roman mosaics in the world.The site received a 30 million euro grant from the EU for much needed restoration work. But three years after the deadline for completion, that work has not been finished and the locals are in despair. Naomi Fowler has been finding out more.The German beer making a splash on the export marketGerman beer is known around the world for its high quality. As a result, it's possible to order one in New York, Sydney or Paris – pretty much anywhere.More often than not, the German beers sold in other countries are licensed from major brands like Becks. But in recent years, a lesser known beer from the city of Cologne has been making a splash in the export market. Experienced beer-drinker and dedicated reporter Catherine Bolsover went to find out just what's behind this little beer's sudden rise in popularity.