Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs. 11.06.2011 June 11, 2011

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· ·

On today's programme: What lessons can be drawn from Europe’s EHEC scare?- Greek protesters take to the streets yet again - Italy marks its 150th birthday as a nation - Swiss women celebrate an important anniversary - How truancy is on the increase in the UK - The debate over bilingual schools in Latvia - Shadow education is booming across Europe - The Berlin kindergarten where culture is king.Criticism of Germany's handling of health crisisGermany has been facing growing criticism from around Europe over its handling of the E.coli outbreak. During emergency talks, EU agriculture ministers said mistakes by German ...



On today's programme: What lessons can be drawn from Europe’s EHEC scare?- Greek protesters take to the streets yet again - Italy marks its 150th birthday as a nation - Swiss women celebrate an important anniversary - How truancy is on the increase in the UK - The debate over bilingual schools in Latvia - Shadow education is booming across Europe - The Berlin kindergarten where culture is king.Criticism of Germany's handling of health crisisGermany has been facing growing criticism from around Europe over its handling of the E.coli outbreak. During emergency talks, EU agriculture ministers said mistakes by German authorities were continuing to wreak havoc for the fruit and veg sector and causing confusion for consumers. But the big question now is, who will pay for the damage? Vanessa Mock reports from Brussels.What lessons can be drawn from Europe’s E.coli scare?While EU diplomats and farmers struggle to contain the economic fallout of the EHEC crisis, scientists have been brooding over this vicious strain of E.coli which is reportedly resistant to antibiotics. Now, for a long time antibiotics were regarded as the panacea for infectious diseases. But their use and misuse have resulted in a growing number of resistant bacteria. And this is now a significant health problem: every year over 25,000 people in Europe die from infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. So, what lessons can we draw from the current EHEC crisis for the future treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, especially if one of the strongest weapons in our arsenal is getting blunter by the day. Neil King put that question to Dr Claudia Stein, the Director of Research and Innovation at the World Health Organisation’s European office in Copenhagen. Greek protesters take to the streets yet againThis week Greece was hit by yet another string of protests and strikes over the government’s planned austerity measures. Greece has already received a 110 billion euro bailout from the EU and IMF, but with the country’s debts soaring to some 350 billion euros experts say a second bailout is unavoidable to keep the country afloat. In return EU diplomats want Greece to push through stricter fiscal and structural reforms. But as Anthee Carassava reports from Athens, many Greeks have had enough. An important anniversary for Swiss womenForty years ago this week, Swiss women went to the polls for the first time – because after decades of campaigning, they were finally granted the vote in 1971. This week, women across the country celebrated what for them remains a huge, and hard won victory. Imogen Foulkes reports from Berne.How united is Italy?It’s 150 years since a patchwork of kingdoms, states and principalities in southern Europe were united to form Italy. And throughout this year, various events are being held to commemorate the anniversary. For most, the land of pizza and pasta has a strong identity, but some are using the unification celebrations to ask whether there is one Italy, or rather a fragmented state that’s changed little since 1861. Jean Di Marino has been finding more in Rome.Truancy is on the increase in the UKSchool truancy rates in the UK have hit a new high. Figures show a 12 per cent rise in the number of pupils “bunking off” last year's autumn term compared to the year before. The problem's been getting worse over the last decade or so and it’s not just a problem of disgruntled teenagers...as Nik Martin reports from a town just north of London.The debate over bilingual schools in LatviaThe education system in Latvia is under review. Around 27 percent of the country’s population is ethnic Russian. And many of this community’s young people attend state funded minority schools where they’re taught in both Russian and Latvian. But an opposition party has launched an initiative to put an end to this bilingual structure. It’s campaigning for lessons to be conducted only in Latvian. Gederts Gelzis reports from Riga on the ensuring debate. Shadow education is booming across EuropeIt seems more and more Europeans are relying on private tuition to give their children a head start in life. According to a new report which was commissioned by the European Commission, parents in France and Germany alone now spend more than 3 billion euros a year on additional schooling for their children. This so-called "shadow education" has far-reaching implications for social equity, the knowledge economy and the lives of children and families. The report, called "The Challenge of Shadow Education" was written by Professor Mark Bray who specializes in comparative education at the University of Hong Kong. He told me more about this growing trend and its impact on society. Highlighting corruption in the Czech RepublicAn NGO in the Czech Republic is trying to highlight the extent of corruption there. The Respekt Institute has organized a travelling open-air exhibition focussing on corruption. It’s a serious problem in the country and the organizers of the exhibition want to raise awareness about this issue and spark debate. Ian Willoughby has more from Prague.The Berlin kindergarten where culture is kingA new kindergarten in Berlin is providing a daily dose of culture for its kiddies. The idea behind this so-called culture kindergarten is to broaden horizons at an early age. It was set up by Germany’s Dussmann Group which is one of the country’s largest service providers. Hardy Graupner has the details from the suburb of Marzahn.