Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 16.04.2011 April 16, 2011

from Inside Europe· ·

Is Italy's refugee crisis jeopardizing EU cohesion? - NATO's campaign in Libya evokes bitter memories in Serbia – The impact of Gagarin's historic space trip – Why the link to home is vital for soldiers serving abroad - How 140 characters can define the happiness of an entire nation - Eastern Europe's forgotten wine heritage - How rural Scotland is profiting from the world's thirst for whisky. Is Italy's refugee crisis jeopardizing EU cohesion?Due to the political unrest in North Africa, immigration has become an ever-more pressing - and contentious - issue in Europe. Italy, in particular, is complaining bitterly ...



Is Italy's refugee crisis jeopardizing EU cohesion? - NATO's campaign in Libya evokes bitter memories in Serbia – The impact of Gagarin's historic space trip – Why the link to home is vital for soldiers serving abroad - How 140 characters can define the happiness of an entire nation - Eastern Europe's forgotten wine heritage - How rural Scotland is profiting from the world's thirst for whisky. Is Italy's refugee crisis jeopardizing EU cohesion?Due to the political unrest in North Africa, immigration has become an ever-more pressing - and contentious - issue in Europe. Italy, in particular, is complaining bitterly about having to bear the brunt of migrants crossing from North Africa to its southern island of Lampedusa.At this week's meeting of 27 European Union interior ministers, Italy proposed to make it easier for immigrants who first land on the island to travel elsewhere in Europe, by issuing six-month temporary residence permits - an idea other EU nations rejected. As Megan Williams reports from Rome, with migrant boats continuing to cross over to Italy, tension over immigrants in Europe keeps mounting. Europe's Schengen zone comes under fireThe EU's visa-free Schengen zone makes it very difficult for Italy's neighbours to keep a check on who's coming and going. There is discussion here in Germany to start strengthening border controls, but the theory is more straightforward than the practice.Rob Turner asked Professor Kay Hailbronner, director of the Research centre for immigration and asylum at Constance University, how much pressure is being put on Europe's borders.NATO's campaign in Libya evokes bitter memories in SerbiaNATO remains split over its ongoing air campaign in Libya. The military intervention is drawing comparisons to the war in Kosovo. Exactly 12 years ago, NATO warplanes were attacking targets in Serbia under the guise of protecting civilians in the Balkan state's breakaway southern province.With bitter memories of that 78-day campaign still fresh, some Serbians are rallying behind Muammar Gaddafi. Nate Tabak reports from Belgrade.Russia's space hero leaves his mark on a generationRussians have been gazing longingly at the skies this week… marveling at the event 50 years ago which defined the Space Race between the Soviet Union and the United States.On April 12th, 1961 Yuri Gagarin became the first man to orbit the earth in what was a victorious achievement at the height of the Cold War. It would be another 8 years before the Americans got the upper hand when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. Nowadays astronauts travel regularly to the International Space Station where the Americans and the Russians work together. Karen Percy reports from Moscow.Europe debates new data protection laws for the online ageThe advertising industry and privacy campaigners in the UK are engaged in a battle over cookies - no, not home-baked treats but rather the digital kind.A planned European regulation on how cookies are placed on your PC has reignited the debate over these small items of data, and how much advertisers should be allowed to know about our internet habits. Robin Powell reports.How 140 characters can define the happiness of an entire nationTwitter is all about sharing thoughts and information with the world in just 140 characters. But how much can we really read into these short messages, or tweets as they're known?That's the question Alex Davies, a Gates Scholar studying machine learning at Cambridge University, wanted to answer and he developed a Twitter Happiness Map. The results were rather surprising. According to the criteria, Germany – the land that gave the world the notion of Angst – came out top. Rob Turner spoke to Alex Davies and asked him how's it possible to gauge how happy someone is in just 140 characters? Why the link to home is vital for soldiers serving abroadA compilation of correspondence between German soldiers in Afghanistan and their loved ones back home has recently been published in Germany.The book reflects the emotions of soldiers on tour, how they cope with loneliness, stress and being away from home. Amy Zayed looks now at what forces communication means, and how important it was and still is to soldiers and their families, not only in Germany, but everywhere in the world.Rediscovering Eastern Europe's forgotten wine heritageWine lovers sip their way across France, Spain and Italy, enjoying the rich bounty of fine wines. These countries dominate the market. Yet nearly all of Europe's countries produce wine, much of it worthy of a sniff, swirl and sip.More than a dozen countries from the Old Continent promoted their wines at the latest edition of the prestigious wine convention VinItaly in Verona, Italy. Our reporter Nancy Greenleese discovered some European reds and whites that might make the better known wine countries slightly green with envy.Rural Scotland is profiting from the world's thirst for whiskyWhile wine-growing may transcend borders, the opposite is true for Scotch whisky. In fact, in order for the spirit to be called Scotch whisky, it must be made in Scotland. And when consumers think of whisky, they are clearly associating it with Scotland more and more as the country's whisky industry is in the middle of a boom. While sales in traditional markets are still strong, emerging markets in Asia and Latin America are providing sustainable growth and encouraging tremendous investment by industry players. Laura Schweiger travelled to Scotland to find out why, when it comes to Scotch whisky, the world is thirsting for more.