Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 17.09.2011 Sept. 17, 2011

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· ·

Can Greece afford to ditch the euro for its old currency? - Did African dictators finance France's political elite? - Palestinians in Berlin prepare for an historic vote - Austrian priests push for change they can believe in - Britain tries to see eye to eye with the Russian bear - Why bees are taking off at Frankfurt Airport - Easy riders take over the streets of Copenhagen.Can Greece afford to ditch the euro for its old currency?German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy said this week that Greece remains an integral part of the eurozone. The leaders ...



Can Greece afford to ditch the euro for its old currency? - Did African dictators finance France's political elite? - Palestinians in Berlin prepare for an historic vote - Austrian priests push for change they can believe in - Britain tries to see eye to eye with the Russian bear - Why bees are taking off at Frankfurt Airport - Easy riders take over the streets of Copenhagen.Can Greece afford to ditch the euro for its old currency?German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy said this week that Greece remains an integral part of the eurozone. The leaders held emergency talks after days of turmoil sparked by fears that Greece was heading for a catastrophic default.There's been speculation that the country may be forced to return to its old currency, the drachma, because it cannot meet financial targets laid down by the EU and the International Monetary Fund. Once it was taboo in Europe to discuss eurozone exits, but not any more, as Malcolm Brabant reports from Greece.Did African dictators finance France's political elite?In France this week former President Jacques Chirac was accused of receiving suitcases full of cash while in office. The allegation was made by a former aide who claimed to be the go-between at the centre of decades of illegal financial transactions between West African leaders and successive French presidents.As John Laurenson reports from Paris, Chirac is not the only famous politician who's been named.Palestinians in Berlin prepare for an historic voteNext Tuesday, the United Nations may have to square up to one of the toughest questions in world politics. The Palestinian Authority is aiming to press ahead with its bid for UN membership status, despite threats from the United States to use its veto.But the larger question is how will this affect the Palestinian diaspora – estimated to be around five to six million people. Ben Knight and Sam Cowie visited the substantial Palestinian community in Berlin to find out how the vote is being welcomed. A closed community opens up in PragueOne of the largest immigrant communities in the Czech Republic is made up of the Vietnamese. They now run many – if not most – of the country's convenience stores. Czechs seem nonplussed at their presence. They certainly appreciate their services, but have little to do with them socially, and the community itself is generally closed to outsiders.But newer generations of Vietnamese are feeling increasingly confident about their place in Czech society, and are beginning to open up to their neighbours. Rob Cameron has more from Prague.Britain tries to see eye to eye with the Russian bearBritish Prime Minister David Cameron met with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in Moscow on Monday. It was the first bilateral visit by a British prime minister since 2005, underscoring the UK's desire to put its rocky relationship with Moscow on a more pragmatic footing.Relations have been tense since a former KGB officer was murdered in London five years ago – a case which remains unsolved. Geert Groot Koerkamp reports from Moscow.Austrian priests push for change they can believe inIn Austria hundreds of Catholic Priests have issued what they call a "Declaration of Disobedience". The priests are calling for major reform of the Catholic Church including allowing women into the priesthood and an end to the celibacy rule.As Kerry Skyring reports from Vienna, the priests are now practicing what they preach.Easy riders take over the streets of CopenhagenNext week the annual world championships for bicycle road racing will take place in Copenhagen. The city is an appropriate venue for this week long competition. Copenhagen is one of the most bicycle friendly cities in the world. In fact, there's even a term "Copenhagenization", an urban design concept relating to improving pedestrian facilities and cyclepaths.But is this healthy and environmentally friendly approach to transport leading to bike congestion? Helen Seeney spoke to Frits Bredal from the Danish Cylists' Federation.Why bees are taking off at Frankfurt AirportFrankfurt Airport is one of the world's busiest. But travellers passing through it probably don't realize that some fellow fliers are hard at work not far from the runway. Researchers there are using bees to monitor air quality.Frankfurt Airport is run by Fraport and it's the only airport operator listed on the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index, which measures corporate sustainability performance. Susan Stone reports on why the airport has invested in the environment.The discovery of slowness in ItalyThe Slow Food movement has tried to change the way we eat. For a quarter of a century, this organization founded in Italy has encouraged us to load up our plates with food that is "good, clean and fair."This means tasty, healthy food created with respect for the environment and offered at accessible prices for consumers and producers. But how do we wash down our Slow Food? With Slow Wine, of course. The movement is hoping to revolutionize how we drink. Nancy Greenleese took a long, languid sip of some Slow Wines and sent us this report.