Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 19.08.2010 Aug. 20, 2010

from Inside Europe· ·

On today's programme: A holiday special checking out trends and tips in European tourism. Greece's fall from grace - Brits holidaying at home - A Fab Four city trip to Hamburg - A tiny Serbian village hosting the world's biggest trumpet festival - Italian anti-mafia groups use tourism to fight back - The dilemma of being a Berlin tour guide - And we visit Malaga's annual Feria. Greek tourism falls from graceGreece is usually heaving with tourists at this time of year. Tourism is a key industry in Greece, generating 20 percent of the country's income. But according to a ...



On today's programme: A holiday special checking out trends and tips in European tourism. Greece's fall from grace - Brits holidaying at home - A Fab Four city trip to Hamburg - A tiny Serbian village hosting the world's biggest trumpet festival - Italian anti-mafia groups use tourism to fight back - The dilemma of being a Berlin tour guide - And we visit Malaga's annual Feria. Greek tourism falls from graceGreece is usually heaving with tourists at this time of year. Tourism is a key industry in Greece, generating 20 percent of the country's income. But according to a senior government official, strikes and domestic terrorism have had a devastating impact on tourism.On Greece's largest island, Crete, some industry officials believe earnings from tourism this year are likely to fall by 30 percent - three times more than government estimates. From Crete, Malcolm Brabant has been finding out more.More Brits are opting for "staycations"The recession is having an impact on tourism right across Europe this year. Many people are holidaying at home rather than heading off to exotic destinations.The British, for example, have long travelled overseas for a guarantee of summer sunshine. But last year, the British made 15 percent fewer trips abroad, as families decided to tighten their belts. And that figure is expected to be higher this year. Nik Martin travelled to a traditional English seaside resort to see if the "staycation" phenonemon is real. Hamburg celebrates its love affair with the BeatlesIf you're a fan of the Beatles, you might want to consider a trip to Hamburg this year. There's a special programme of events celebrating the city's connection to the Fab Four.In fact it was 50 years ago this week that they played their first gig in Hamburg and they then spent two years in the city. You can check out The Beatlemania Museum and the clubs where they once played. Neale Lytollis has been finding out more.Serbia's unique trumpet festival strikes a chordFor a few days each year, the tiny village of Guca in the west of Serbia, with a population of just 2,000, makes one hell of a racket. It's the home of the world's biggest trumpet festival, attended by well over half a million people.And this year is the 50th anniversary of an event that captures the very best of Serbian culture and tradition. Mark Lowen went to discover the brass bands, hog roasts and flag-waving extravaganza that's made the name Guca travel well beyond the borders of the Balkans. Cash-strapped tourists live it up in BratislavaOne of Europe's youngest countries is Slovakia – created in 1993 with the breakup of Czechoslovakia. It's capital, Bratislava, doesn't attract hordes of tourists like Prague or Budapest.But it's well known by the backpacker brigade, keen to explore the network of cobbled streets in the Old Town, the majestic castle with its view of the river Danube and the sleek new bars lining the pavements. So what can you enjoy in Bratislava without spending too much money? We sent Rob Cameron to the Slovak capital to find out. A new guide book explores ABBA's StockholmThe Swedish capital, Stockholm, is not a city you associate with a cheap holiday. But it's one of Europe's most beautiful cities with a stunning location on the water, picturesque old town and vibrant nightlife. And now a new guidebook will introduce you to less obvious attractions.It's called "The ABBA Guide to Stockholm" and yes, it'll take you to around 60 places around the city associated with Agnetha, Frida, Benny and Björn. Its author is ABBA fan Sara Russell and she told me why she wrote the book. How to be a good Berlin tour guide?There's nothing like wandering around a city at your own pace. But guided tours are a good way to discover hidden corners and to catch some of the local gossip. But watch out! Even the most seasoned guides might be tempted to mix fact with fiction to sell their city.Historian Kevin Kennedy should know. He's a tour guide in Berlin. And in the following Postcard, Kevin describes what it takes to walk the tightrope between accuracy and entertainment.Italian anti-mafia groups fight back with tourismItaly is a mecca for millions of holidaymakers. Sipping Chianti under the Tuscan sun, tables laden with delicious food and historic buildings – that's the image many foreigners have of the country. But it's not all la dolce vita. Particularly in Sicily.Many Sicilians live in poverty and some say the Mafia is largely to blame. For decades, it's had a stranglehold on the economy and people there. But anti-Mafia groups are finding creative ways to fight back through tourism. Thirty kilometers from Palermo, a mob boss's farmhouse is now a small hotel and restaurant where exquisite meals are spiced with honesty. Nancy Greenleese has more.Malaga celebrates its largest annual festivalThe city of Malaga in Spain is largely unknown outside the country. But each year it hosts one of Spain's biggest festivals. It's called the Feria de Malaga and lasts for 9 days - and it's wrapping up this weekend. More than 6 million people take part and the whole city puts on its finery for the festival.Its origins date back to 1487 when Spain's Catholic monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, reclaimed Malaga from its Arab rulers, the Moors. Mariana Schroeder joined the crowds this week and sent this report.