Inside Europe: The Inside Take on European Affairs April 3, 2010

from Inside Europe· ·

On this week's program: Russia's northern Caucasus region spiraling out of control - EU seeks to stamp out child pornography on the Internet - Death trends displayed at world's largest funeral fair - Germans and Turks get lost in translation - Living library helps fight prejudices - New film sheds light on a dark episode in French history - English villages battle out a 2000-year-old tradition
Russia's northern Caucasus region spiraling out of control

This week, a double terrorist attack on Moscow's subway left at least 39 people dead and dozens injured.

According to Russian authorities, the attacks were carried out ...



On this week's program: Russia's northern Caucasus region spiraling out of control - EU seeks to stamp out child pornography on the Internet - Death trends displayed at world's largest funeral fair - Germans and Turks get lost in translation - Living library helps fight prejudices - New film sheds light on a dark episode in French history - English villages battle out a 2000-year-old tradition
Russia's northern Caucasus region spiraling out of control

This week, a double terrorist attack on Moscow's subway left at least 39 people dead and dozens injured.

According to Russian authorities, the attacks were carried out by two female suicide bombers. Allegedly, they had links to militant groups in the North Caucasus where radical Islamist rebels have been fighting a guerrilla war against Russian forces for years. Days after the Moscow attacks, at least 12 people were killed in bombings in Russia's north Caucasus republic of Dagestan. The attacks have raised concerns that Russia's northern Caucasus region is spiraling out of control. Neil King asked our Moscow correspondent Geert Kroot Koerkamp just how great a powder keg the region is for Russia.

EU seeks to stamp out child pornography on the Internet

The European Commission has outlined new plans to tackle child pornography on the Internet.

The key proposal would require European Union member states to block offensive websites. But debate is already raging as to whether this is the right method to control child pornography on the Internet. Germany says it would be better to erase illegal content completely. Nicole Goebel has the details.

Britain launches space agency

NASA has a new rival - well almost. Britain has launched its very own space agency, with just one astronaut and two percent of NASA's budget.

Critics have questioned London's decision to earmark an annual 300 million euros for the project, especially since Britain is barely managing to navigate through stormy economic waters, let alone space. But the British government has its eyes fixed on the stars and argues that the project has the potential to create over 100,000 new jobs. Stephen Beard has this report from London.

Postcard from Europe: Fears of the big bang

Scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) have come a step closer to understanding how our universe was created.

In a landmark experiment this week, CERN's Large Hadron Collider managed to produce thousands of mini-big bangs similar to the explosion that is believed to have created our universe billions of years ago. While scientists are jubilant, critics fear CERN's experiments could wipe out our world. But as Imogen Foulkes reports in this Postcard from Switzerland, there's no need to get out your Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy just yet.

Death trends displayed at world's largest funeral fair

One thing in life is certain: we all have to make our final bow sooner or later.

It can be useful to prepare for this exit in advance. TANEXPO, the International Exhibition of Funerals and Cemeteries, recently held in Bologna, is the largest trade fair of its kind. Our reporter Dany Mitzman went along. She discovered that the death industry is not only thriving, it also offers many interesting and comforting innovations.

Germans and Turks get lost in translation

Integrating Turks into German society has been a sensitive issue ever since it started to dawn on Germans that many of the so-called "guest workers" they had invited in the 1960s actually planned on staying for good.

This week, the spat over how to integrate Turks into German society erupted anew after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan called on Germany to introduce Turkish high schools. The demand, which was received badly in Germany, coincided with Chancellor Angela Merkel's two-day state visit to Turkey. Merkel was quick to reject the proposal, saying that German had to remain the first language in schools in Germany. The dispute highlights an unresolved issue in German-Turkish relations: how to integrate some three million Turks into German society? Germany has had an office for integrating migrant workers for decades. But why then is it still having so many problems in integrating the Turkish community? Neil King put that question to Dr. Christal Morehouse, the integration expert at the German think tank Bertelsmann Stiftung.

Living library with books in the flesh helps fight prejudices

Integration is not just an issue in Germany. In fact, Turkey's record is far from good when it comes to integrating Armenians and Kurds, for instance, who are often discriminated against or eyed with suspicion.

This is where the Living Library comes in. Instead of taking out a book, you get the chance of talking to people you normally wouldn't meet in real life. The project, which aims to break down barriers, originated in Denmark. But recently, Turks have had the opportunity to visit the library and chip away at their own prejudices. Dorian Jones has the details from Istanbul.

New film sheds light on a dark episode in French history

In France, a subject that was once taboo is now playing on the big screen. The movie "La Rafle" - portraying one of the country's darkest episodes from World War Two - is getting a lot of attention.

For the first time, events concerning the largest round-up of Parisian Jews are recreated in a drama starring several well-known French actors. What makes this issue so sensitive in France is that the roundup was not carried out by the Nazis, but rather by the French police. Eleanor Beardsley has the details from Paris.

Serbians enjoy EU travel

2010 marks the first year that Serbians can fully enjoy unrestricted travel in the European Union's Schengen Zone.

This comes after the EU lifted visa requirements for three Balkan states in December, hinting at the possibility of future EU membership. Serbia had virtually been cut off from the international community since the Balkan wars of the 1990s. Now, after more than 20 years of isolation, the number of passenger flights to EU destinations is soaring, and even some of the staunchest Euro-skeptics in Serbia have changed their tune with regard to the country's EU membership bid. Sabina Casagrande presents this report by Dejan Sajinovic.

Two small English villages battle out a 2000-year-old tradition

Anyone looking for an unusual experience over Easter this year should consider booking a flight to England - to the small village of Hallaton to be precise.

For 364 days a year, this small village in Leicestershire is steeped in quiet, chocolate-box charm. But as Lars Bevanger reports, each Easter Monday, the place descends into organized anarchy, as hundreds of young Hallaton men battle with neighbors from Medbourne in the ancient game of bottle kicking.