Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 23.04.2011 April 16, 2011

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· ·

Norway explores new methods to tackle oil spills - Europe's anti-nuclear activists increase the pressure - Divorce rates hit a new high in the UK - Britons cash in on the royal wedding - Is a new protest movement emerging in Armenia? - Immigrants in Moscow go underground - Celebrating Holy Week in Seville - Berlin tour operators spice up their bus routes - German musicals return to the stage. Norway explores new methods to avoid catastrophic oil spillsA year ago this week, BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig exploded, leading to a spill of more than 800 million litres ...



Norway explores new methods to tackle oil spills - Europe's anti-nuclear activists increase the pressure - Divorce rates hit a new high in the UK - Britons cash in on the royal wedding - Is a new protest movement emerging in Armenia? - Immigrants in Moscow go underground - Celebrating Holy Week in Seville - Berlin tour operators spice up their bus routes - German musicals return to the stage. Norway explores new methods to avoid catastrophic oil spillsA year ago this week, BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig exploded, leading to a spill of more than 800 million litres of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. While no one wants to see another spill anything like it, chances are we will. That's why scientists around the world are hard at work researching new methods and technologies to deal with future accidents better and faster.Among them are scientists from the Norwegian research organisation SINTEF. In the SINTEF sea lab in Trondheim, oil experts investigate what happens to different types of oil when they interact with sea water in projects commissioned by the oil industry and government regulators. Irene Quaile paid a visit to the lab.Europe's anti-nuclear activists increase the pressureTens of thousands of Germans are taking to the streets over the Easter weekend. They are demonstrating as part of the Easter Marches, a decades-old tradition where citizens call for peace and non-violence. This year, things are a bit different.One of the biggest marches will take place at the Mehlem uranium enrichment plant near the Dutch border in the western German region known as Muensterland, where an expected 10,000 marchers will be calling not just for nuclear disarmament, but for an end to nuclear power as well. Matthias Eickhoff is a spokesman for the Muensterland Anti-Nuclear Network, which organized the march. Matt Hermann asked him how the repercussions from Fukushima are affecting Europe's anti-nuclear movement. Divorce rates hit a new high in the UKOn the 29th of April the British will be celebrating what looks set to be one of the country's most popular royal weddings ever as Prince William marries his Uni sweetheart, Kate Middleton. And Royal Wedding fever in Britain is reaching a critical level.But down among us commoners, there are concerns about the future of holy matrimony. Marriage rates have hit a new low. So why have the Brits ditched getting hitched? And will the images of Kate and Wills' fairytale wedding get more people to "tie the knot"? Nik Martin in London was determined to find out.Britons cash in on royal wedding memorabiliaFor many it's a great reason for a party, for others it's a huge business opportunity. Makers of royal wedding memorabilia have already started churning out plates, cups, posters and dolls.But this time not all products are equally politically correct, as Lars Bevanger reports from Manchester.Is a new protest movement emerging in Armenia?For the first time in three years, a protest movement against the government has been mounting in Yerevan. If you haven't heard much about it - even in this season of revolt in the Arab world - that's no big surprise. Armenia lacks the natural resources that make the Middle East of vital concern to the West.But it is a member of the Council of Europe and sits in one of the world's hot zones, where Armenian relations are tense with neighbors Azerbaijan and Turkey. Shant Shahrigian reports from the Armenian capital on the protest movement's efforts to find its way.Immigrants in Moscow go undergroundSome in the Caucasus have given up on their governments, even on their countries future. They've gone looking for a new life in the big cities of Russia, often as undocumented immigrants. It's tough going - Moscow is one of the most expensive cities in the world. The average Russian earns about 1000 dollars a month, undocumented migrants far less.Many can't afford proper shelter, and have to improvise. Recently, Moscow authorities uncovered a rather unusual hideout. Jessica Golloher has the details from Moscow.Celebrating Holy Week in the Spanish city of SevilleEaster, the most important celebration in the Christian liturgical year, is upon us. It's being observed all over the world in different ways, but few commemorations of the death and re-birth of Jesus can compare to the one in Seville, Spain – at least as far as pomp and ceremony go.The entire city is transformed during the seven days of Holy Week. Long processions of hooded men wind their way through the city's streets toward the main cathedral, bearing floats adorned with figures of the saints or biblical scenes. While it's a tradition that dates from the Middle Ages, it's very much alive in the 21st Century. Kyle James reports.Tour operators in Berlin spice up their sightseeing bus routesWith around nine million people visiting Berlin each year it's not unusual to see bus tours operated by several different companies, shuttling tourists around Germany's capital and pointing out the sites: the Brandenburg Gate, the Bundestag or the longest remaining stretch of Berlin Wall.It's a good way to get it all done in a matter of hours, but it's not for everybody - some of us are looking for something a little more niche. Film buff, for example, could always take the VideoBusTour; a multi-media journey through Berlin visiting key locations in the city used as filming locations for cinema productions. Neale Lytollis hopped onboard to find out more.Musicals made in Germany return to the stageWhen it comes to the world's opera repertoire, there is no denying the extensive contribution that German composers have made. But what about musicals?There was a time when German musicals and show tunes were an important part of the county's entertainment landscape, but these days the bigger theatres are largely dominated by shows from the West End and Broadway. That does not please local composers and artists, who, as Tamsin Walker found out, say the time has come for their work to see the light of a stage.