Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 26.08.2010 Sept. 3, 2010

from Inside Europe· ·

On today's programme: New book scrutinises the work of aid agencies in crisis regions - France closes more Roma camps - Italian Mafiosi exploit a TV show - The Ibiza of Ukraine - Kosovo cracks down on headscarves - The mixed legacy of Poland’s solidarity movement on its 30th anniversary - Spaniards lock horns over Catalonia’s bullfighting ban - Testing the water at a fish foot spa - Sail AmsterdamA new book scrutinises the work of aid agencies in crisis regionsEurope’s response to Pakistan’s flood crisis has been sluggish compared to let’s say the Asian tsunami in 2004 or this ...



On today's programme: New book scrutinises the work of aid agencies in crisis regions - France closes more Roma camps - Italian Mafiosi exploit a TV show - The Ibiza of Ukraine - Kosovo cracks down on headscarves - The mixed legacy of Poland’s solidarity movement on its 30th anniversary - Spaniards lock horns over Catalonia’s bullfighting ban - Testing the water at a fish foot spa - Sail AmsterdamA new book scrutinises the work of aid agencies in crisis regionsEurope’s response to Pakistan’s flood crisis has been sluggish compared to let’s say the Asian tsunami in 2004 or this year’s earthquake in Haiti. Maybe this is because Pakistan has an image problem in the west. Allegations of corruption and Pakistani links to terrorists targeting western forces in neighbouring Afghanistan have probably played their part in tightening the purse strings among Europeans. But while would-be donors try to shake off that nagging feeling that they shouldn’t be mixing politics with humanitarian aid, a Dutch journalist is questioning the role of aid organisations per se. Linda Polman has first-hand experiences of aid organisations operating in crisis regions. Her book titled "The Crisis Caravan" will be published in the US in September. In it she says that aid organisations in fact perpetuate humanitarian disasters. Neil King asked her how she came to this conclusion.France steps up its crackdown on Roma campsThere's been widespread indignation in France at what many in the country see as the repressive and discriminatory treatment of Roma Gypsies. The Interior Minister announced earlier this week that France had dismantled over 100 illegal Roma camps and deported over 600 people back to Romania and Bulgaria since the clampdown began a month ago. Figures in the Catholic Church were especially vocal in their condemnation of the government. Even an address by Pope Benedict has been interpreted as a criticism of France. John Laurenson in Paris has the details.Italian Mafiosi exploit a popular TV showIn Italy, Mafiosi have been using a popular TV football program as a means of communication with jailed clan members. It turns that the show, Quelli che...il Calcio, was not only scrolling the usual fan text messages across the bottom of the screen but also secret mob messages. A bit of an own goal for the popular show. Nancy Greenleese sent us this postcard about technology gone bad. A touch of Ibiza in UkraineIt’s one of the most talked-about music festivals in the Russian-speaking world: Kazantip. The event, held on Ukraine’s Black Sea coastline, originally started out back in 1992 as a kite-boarding and surfing competition. But over the years the DJs who provided the music for this event became a bigger attraction than the actual competitions. And today Kazantip also attracts an increasing number western party-goers. Our reporter Tom Wilson went along to find out what makes this festival so appealing.Kosovo cracks down on headscarves in public schoolsThe International Court of Justice recently said that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law. It's a decision that the Kosovan government hopes will now allow it to get on with building a state. But one of the most controversial laws passed by the young government is one banning headscarves in public schools. The move has sparked protests among the population, which is around 90% Muslim. From Kosovo, Mark Lowen reports.The mixed legacy of Poland’s solidarity movement on its 30th anniversaryThis month sees celebrations in Poland marking the 30th anniversary of shipyard strikes on the Baltic coast which gave rise to Solidarity, Eastern Europe’s first anti-communist movement. But there’s a sour note in the festive atmosphere. There have been endless rows concerning the official ceremonies between the country’s liberal president and government and the national opposition. As Rafal Kiepuszewski reports from Poland, the irony is that the two rival camps stem from the same original solidarity background. Spaniards lock horns over Catalonia’s bullfighting banDespite last month’s vote in Catalonia to ban bullfighting beginning in 2012, the spectacle remains very popular in large parts of Spain. In the city of Malaga in southern Spain, for instance, bullfighting is an integral part of the annual Feria festivities. And every August more than 9,000 people crowd into the city’s Malagueta bullring on a daily basis to watch the ancient battle of man against beast. Mariana Schroeder was there and has this report.London's first fish foot spa attracts nibblesLondon's first ever fish foot spa has opened and is doing a brisk, if slightly bemused, trade. Fish foot spas are common in parts of Asia but are only now arriving in European countries. Dozens of fish nibble at customers' feet to exfoliate dead skin to give the latest pedicure in town. Olly Barratt has been dipping his toes in to test the water.A nautical spectacular in AmsterdamAmsterdam has just played host to one of Europe's biggest nautical events. Hundreds of ships docked in the harbour and along the city's river, the Ij, and the spectacle attracted about 1.5 million visitors. SAIL Amsterdam only takes place every 5 years and it's an opportunity to see the latest in sailing technology or simply to catch a glimpse of nautical history. Cintia Taylor went along to find out more.