Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 29.07.2010 Aug. 5, 2010

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· ·

On today's programme: The Wikileaks scandal: shocking revelations or old news at a bad time? - France gets tough on terrorists in North Africa - The demise of Germany’s Love Parade- Cliff divers risk life and limb in Switzerland - Saving Athens’ cultural heritage in times of crisis - Unique photos of the Fab Four go under the hammer - Drumming off the beaten track in IrelandThe Wikileaks scandal – shocking revelations or old news at a bad time?Coalition forces in Afghanistan are still trying to gauge the impact that the leaking of 90,000 secret US military records will have ...



On today's programme: The Wikileaks scandal: shocking revelations or old news at a bad time? - France gets tough on terrorists in North Africa - The demise of Germany’s Love Parade- Cliff divers risk life and limb in Switzerland - Saving Athens’ cultural heritage in times of crisis - Unique photos of the Fab Four go under the hammer - Drumming off the beaten track in IrelandThe Wikileaks scandal – shocking revelations or old news at a bad time?Coalition forces in Afghanistan are still trying to gauge the impact that the leaking of 90,000 secret US military records will have on the war in Afghanistan.The Pentagon documents dating from 2004 to 2009 describe hitherto unreported incidents of civilian deaths, clandestine operations of US special forces, as well as Iranian and Pakistani links to Taliban insurgents. The classified information was evaluated by The Guardian, The New York Times and Der Spiegel, who say it provides an unfiltered picture of the war in Afghanistan. Neil King asked Heinze Schulte, a German defence analyst, whether the data will make European governments more cautious about their involvement in Afghanistan. France gets tough on terrorists in North AfricaThe French government has said it's now "at war" with Al Qaida in North Africa and will step up its fight against Islamist terrorists in the region. This follows the execution of a 78-year-old aid worker, Michel Germaneau, who was kidnapped in Niger back in April. French officials say Al Qaida has been establishing new bases in Africa. And some parliamentarians say France must re-orientate its war on terror – away from Afghanistan and towards France’s former colonies in West Africa where French military interventions have been numerous in the past. From Paris, John Laurenson reports.The demise of Germany’s LoveparadeThe Loveparade, one of the world’s biggest gatherings for fans of techno, used to be a staple of Berlin's events calendar.It ran uninterrupted in the city from 1989-2003. Since then it's been dogged by shifting locations, cancellations and, last weekend, tragedy. In the city of Duisburg, twenty one revellers died as a result of a crush in an access tunnel to the Loveparade. The event has shocked Germany and accusations continue as to who was to blame for the disaster. What is clear is that the Loveparade will not be held again. The Duisburg tragedy is just another black mark against techno; a genre which was once king in Germany but which is now rapidly falling from favour. Neale Lytollis, in the former capital of techno, Berlin, sent us this postcard.Cliff divers risk life and limb at the European championships in SwitzerlandNow, let’s turn to a sport that originated in Hawaii but wasn’t really intended as a sport at all. Cliff diving used to be a means for young men to demonstrate their courage and their loyalty to their chief. But today, it is practised world wide as a serious and highly competitive sport. However, only the most experienced divers have the skill to dive off a 20-metre-high cliff without sustaining any major injury. Imogen Foulkes went to see some of them, competing in the European cliff diving championships in southern Switzerland. Saving Athens’ cultural heritage in times of crisisDespite teetering on the brink of bankruptcy, the Greek government is pledging to spend money improving the country’s architectural treasures. Over the next two weeks, it will unveil a temple on the Acropolis rock that's just been restored. The government says it will also - finally - do more archaeological work on the site of the Academy which was founded by the ancient philosopher, Plato. At the moment it's virtually impossible to find. Our Athens correspondent Malcolm Brabant has been up to the Acropolis as the scaffolding comes down and then went in search of Plato.A new breed of squatters get their foot in the door in the NetherlandsThis autumn, the Netherlands will finally ban squatting. The government has recently done away with a law that allowed anyone to move in to a building if it's been empty for more than a year. Instead, squatters will be forced to find less-disruptive housing. Over the last few years, hundreds of empty buildings have been taken over by a new breed of squatters – or anti-squatters - people who'll move in with the owners’ permission. Nik Martin went along to an old local government building in one town that's been taken over by so-called anti-kraakers.At home with the Beatles - unique photos of the Fab Four go under the hammerA woman from Reading has decided to auction off a unique collection of photos of The Beatles. 59-year-old Sue Baker took the snaps during regular weekend visits to see the Fab Four at their homes in the mid 1960s when she was just 15. Sue first became fascinated with John, Paul, George and Ringo at the start of Beatlemania in 1962. Neil King asked why she as a die-hard fan had decided to sell all her Beatles paraphernalia after all these years.Czech festival celebrates multiculturalismVisitors flocked to the Czech town of Mikulov recently for the annual Nations of the River Dyje Festival, a musical and culinary celebration of ethnic diversity in one of South Moravia’s most beautiful locations. Mikulov and the surrounding Dyje region were mainly German-speaking before the war, but the post-war expulsion of three million ethnic or Sudeten Germans from Czechoslovakia left a vacuum which other nationalities have gradually filled. As Rob Cameron reports, the festival pays tribute to the lost German community and celebrates those who’ve taken their place.Drumming off the beaten track – learning how to play Ireland’s ancient BodhranInis Oirr is a small island off the west coast of Ireland. Every summer people from all over the world descend on Inis Oirr to learn how to play the Irish drums or Bodhran as they are called in Gaelic.The Bodhran is ancient, but a broad range of contemporary music has left its mark on how the drum is played today. Don Duncan has more.