Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 30.04.2011 April 30, 2011

from Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle· · · 1 listeners

On this week's program: Tunisian refugees scramble to get by in Italy - Afghans in Brussels are scared of returning home - Austria's Slovene minority gets a language boost - Life in Chernobyl's radioactive disaster zone - Germany opens its labor market to Eastern Europe - Is Latvia facing a new wave of emigration? - Belgian Veggie Day is food for thought - Germany in the grip of asparagus fever.Tunisian refugees scramble to get by in ItalyThe popular revolutions in the Arab World have been inspiring, but have brought a host of unintended consequences. Take Tunisia - where the uprisings ...



On this week's program: Tunisian refugees scramble to get by in Italy - Afghans in Brussels are scared of returning home - Austria's Slovene minority gets a language boost - Life in Chernobyl's radioactive disaster zone - Germany opens its labor market to Eastern Europe - Is Latvia facing a new wave of emigration? - Belgian Veggie Day is food for thought - Germany in the grip of asparagus fever.Tunisian refugees scramble to get by in ItalyThe popular revolutions in the Arab World have been inspiring, but have brought a host of unintended consequences. Take Tunisia - where the uprisings began in January. After the dictator Zine el Abidine Ben Ali fell, so too did his regime's control over illegal migration.Some 25,000 Tunisians have since left the country, most headed for Italy. Their arrival in Europe has sparked a bitter fight between the Italy and France over who should take the migrants in. Nicolas Sarkozy and Silvio Berlusconi met this week to try and smooth things over, agreeing to talk further, but the refugees themselves are still stuck in limbo. Stephen Beard reports from a camp in the Italian town of Oria.Afghan refugees in Brussels are scared of returning homeThe NATO mission in Afghanistan have said that they are ready to turn over control of large areas of the country to the Afghans because they are now safe.But many Afghans are sceptical - and while the country's exodus continues, those who have come back from abroad have had a very tough time of it. Terri Schultz visited Afghan refugees in Brussels and returnees in Kabul. Austria's Slovene minority gets a language boostIn Austria, a long running dispute between that country and its neighbor Slovenia over the use of bilingual place name signs in the southern Austrian province of Carinthia may finally have been resolved.The region's Slovene minority has long complained about the lack of official recognition of the Slovene language, but there was little progress on that front – that is, until the death of former far right governor Joerg Haider in a car accident in 2008. As Kerry Skyring reports, this week saw an outbreak of harmony.Living with the fallout of Chernobyl's nuclear disasterThis week saw the 25th anniversary of the atomic catastrophe at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine, which then still was a republic of the Soviet Union.A quarter-century has passed, but the accident is still shaping the lives of the people living near the site. For many, the after effects are mostly marked by the legacy of health problems, others – despite the risks – hope to use tourists' fascination with the site as a business opportunity. Our reporter Mareike Aden travelled to the region to speak with the locals.Learning from the German patientEvery country has its health problems – some most starkly in the way health care is administered, or how much it costs.It's a very contentious issue, especially in the United States. And our correspondent Leah McDonnell, as an American living in Germany, has a unique perspective on this – which she shares in this postcard from Berlin.Germany and Austria roll out the welcome matt to foreign job seekersBeginning May 1st, Europe's biggest job market is opening its doors to a lot more people. Yes, Germany, along with Austria, will finally give free rein to job seekers from eight EU countries admitted to the bloc back in 2004: Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.The two countries have waited as long as they could under EU rules to do so, which many say signals a real wariness as to what the move might bring. Matt Hermann asked Deutsche Welle's Berlin correspondent Hardy Graupner, who has been reporting along the German-Polish border, whether people were looking forward to the change.Is Latvia facing a new wave of emigration?The Baltic state of Latvia, which has a population of just 2.2 million people, was hit hard by the financial crisis – its unemployment rate is Europe's second-highest at 17.4%. And many of these may well decide to search for work elsewhere.Latvia has already been through a similar job-related exodus - upon joining the EU in 2004 about 100,000 Latvians left their homeland for Great Britain and Ireland. While some have returned in the meantime, there are fears that the liberalization of the German and Austrian labor markets (as of May 1) may trigger a new exodus. From Riga, Gederts Gelzis reports.Germany's job market holds little appeal for CzechsThe relaxation of labor restrictions in Germany and Austria has gone almost unnoticed in the Czech media, and recruitment agencies haven't even bothered running major campaigns to attract potential Czech migrants.But why are Czechs staying put? Rob Cameron in Prague has the details.Belgian Veggie Day is food for thoughtGoing 24 hours without meat may be a struggle for some people, but what if an entire city went vegetarian? That's what the Belgian city of Ghent is aiming for. At least one day a week.Two years ago Ghent instigated a campaign called Thursday Veggie Day, which encourages residents, school kids and businesses alike to abandon meat every Thursday, to help combat a growing number of environmental problems connected to humans' meat consumption. Hannah Wandel reports on this growing trend.Germany in the grip of asparagus feverAsparagus is sold in just about every German market. Many restaurants offer multi-course menus in which the vegetable is in each course, and it's referred to, variously, as the "vegetable of kings", "edible ivory", or simply "white gold". Why white, you ask? Well, while most other nations prefer green asparagus, for Germans, it's the white asparagus or nothing at all. The season for white asparagus is short – just 6-8 weeks long – and we are smack dab in the middle of it. Kate Hairsine reports from one of the epicentres of white asparagus fever.