Inside Europe: The inside take on European affairs 30.07.2011 July 30, 2011

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On today's program: How far right parties are gaining ground in Europe - The changing faces of Norway - The campaign that has no time for hate - Multiculturalism in the Czech Republic - The Vatican recalls its envoy to Ireland over clerical sex abuse - Taking to the skies over war-torn Libya - Are the Spaniards losing faith in their leaders? - Latvian pig farmers try to save their bacon. How far right parties are gaining ground in EuropeThe twin terror attacks in Norway have led to a renewed focus on far right extremism and anti-immigration groups in Europe. ...



On today's program: How far right parties are gaining ground in Europe - The changing faces of Norway - The campaign that has no time for hate - Multiculturalism in the Czech Republic - The Vatican recalls its envoy to Ireland over clerical sex abuse - Taking to the skies over war-torn Libya - Are the Spaniards losing faith in their leaders? - Latvian pig farmers try to save their bacon. How far right parties are gaining ground in EuropeThe twin terror attacks in Norway have led to a renewed focus on far right extremism and anti-immigration groups in Europe. Far right parties have scored success at the polls in various countries and they seem to be striking a chord with an ever increasing number of voters.Helen Seeney spoke to Jonathan Birdwell who's with the London based think tank Demos. He's currently working on the largest ever survey of far right activists and parties in Europe.The changing faces of NorwayAnders Behring Breivik murdered 76 people to draw attention to what he saw as he evils of immigration and multiculturalism. In a relatively short period of time Norway has grown from a largely white, homogenous society to a multicultural one.Today it's a vibrant society, but as Norwegian journalist Lars Bevanger points out in this postcard, it has not been a painless transformation.Europe's mixed response to the Norwegian terror attacksAs result of the Norway attacks, EU leaders will be discussing the threat from extremist ideology at an upcoming ministerial meeting. The EU will also launch a radicalization awareness network as part of its so-called Internal Security Strategy.But while there's been widespread condemnation of Breivik's actions, some have expressed support for his beliefs. As we hear in the following roundup from three European countries.The campaign that has no time for hateIn the wake of the massacre in Norway many people are searching for answers; why is there such hatred and violence and what can be done to stop it?Earlier this year the US state department launched a worldwide campaign which aims to help. It's called 2011 Hours Against Hate and asks young people to volunteer their time to overcome bigotry and hatred. The campaign was adopted in Austria from where Kerry Skyring reports.A taste of multiculturalism in the Czech RepublicVarious European leaders, including Germany's Angela Merkel and France's Nicolas Sarkozy have said in the past that multuralism has been a failure.But ethnic and cultural diversity is not a new issue in Europe – and nor is it always contentious. As Rob Cameron discovered when he visited an annual festival in a small Czech town.Taking to the skies over war-torn LibyaIt's now four months since NATO began its air strikes on Libya to oust Colonel Gaddafi - and the campaign looks set to continue as the war there settles into a stalemate. There are concerns about the cost and the length of this mission, and some key allies like Italy and Norway are set to scale back their involvement. There's also been growing criticism of the campaign with some countries saying NATO has overstepped its mandate. So just how long can NATO keep going? Our correspondent Vanessa Mock was allowed exclusive access to NATO bases where the Libya operation is being run and has this report.The Vatican recalls its envoy to Ireland over clerical sex abuseIn a rare move, the Vatican recalled its envoy to Ireland this week. This follows a blistering attack on the Vatican by the Irish Prime Minister, Enda Kenny, over child abuse by priests.A new investigation, the Cloyne Report, details how Irish clerics concealed such abuse from the Irish authorities as recently as 2009. Mr Enda said there was a culture of "dysfunction, disconnection, elitism and narcissism" in the Catholic Church. Colm O'Gorman, is a victim of clerical abuse and the Executive Director of Amnesty International in Ireland. He gave Helen Seeney his reaction to the Prime Minister's comments.Are the Spaniards losing faith in their leaders?In Spain, a senior politician has resigned following a barrage of bribery allegations. But he's not the only one to face these kinds of accusations; many other politicians face similar charges.And recent protests seem to show that Spaniards are getting fed up with this generation of politicians. Guy Hedgecoe reports from Madrid.Is Turkey's conflict with the PKK spiralling out of control?Over the past two weeks 20 Turkish soldiers have been killed by the Kurdish rebel group the PKK. The quarter of a century old conflict between the PKK and the Turkish state has erupted again as hopes for a political solution fade.The PKK is fighting for greater rights for Turkey's Kurdish minority which makes up about 20% of the country's population. But there are now fears that the renewed hostilities will erupt into a wider inter-ethnic conflict. Dorian Jones reports from Istanbul.Latvian pig farmers try to save their baconPig farming in Latvia is hovering on the brink of collapse. The price of grain, an important ingredient of the animal's diet, has sky-rocketed while the price of pork has remained at the same low level.As a result, many pig breeders are suffering huge losses forcing some to slaughter their livestock and close down their farms. From Riga Gederts Gelzis has the details.