Communicating Climate Change - why so toxic? [Audio] Oct. 30, 2018

from LSE: Public lectures and events· ·

Speaker(s): Professor Chris Rapley | This visually engaging presentation by Chris Rapley will present the limitations of evidence in informing and motivating action on climate change. Before joining University College London as Professor of Climate Science in the Department of Earth Sciences, Chris Rapley (@ChrisRapley3131) was the Director of the British Antarctic Survey from 1998 to 2007. He was also appointed Director of the Science Museum between 2007, stepping down in 2010. In 2008 he was awarded the Edinburgh Science Medal – “For professional achievements judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity” and, …



Speaker(s): Professor Chris Rapley | This visually engaging presentation by Chris Rapley will present the limitations of evidence in informing and motivating action on climate change. Before joining University College London as Professor of Climate Science in the Department of Earth Sciences, Chris Rapley (@ChrisRapley3131) was the Director of the British Antarctic Survey from 1998 to 2007. He was also appointed Director of the Science Museum between 2007, stepping down in 2010. In 2008 he was awarded the Edinburgh Science Medal – “For professional achievements judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity” and, since 2014, has served as the Chair of European Space Agency (ESA), Director General's High Level Science Policy Advisory Committee. In 2014 Chris Rapley and Duncan Macmillan were commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre to write a play. The play was entitled '2071', is a dramatised lecture which aims to explain climate change and the controversies surrounding it. Tim Dyson is Professor of Population Studies in the Department of International Development at LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRILSE)was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. The Department of International Development (@LSEID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change.