Marketplace Morning Report

by Marketplace · · · · 24 subscribers

In less than 10 minutes, we’ll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace’s David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you’ll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London.

Russia has cut down its gas exports to Europe, leaving officials to figure out a solution as winter crawls closer. We get a less than promising update on the U.S. grain crop. Christopher Low of FHN Financial discusses why American consumers are borrowing more.
First, the BBC checks in as Britain and the world reflect on the life of Queen Elizabeth II. Then, we speak to an author about the rise of "quiet quitting" and its place in workplace culture.
From the BBC World Service: The United Kingdom and the world is remembering the life of Queen Elizabeth II, who has died. Her reign of 70 years was the longest in British history and she witnessed enormous political changes, including the development of the Commonwealth. In the U.K., a period …
The European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve are fighting the same battle against inflation. Diane Swonk of KPMG helps us explore the link between the Fed and global economy. In the U.S., the West is generally holding up against an onslaught of heat, but we look into how power …
We take a quick look into the reasons companies like Walmart and McDonald's have been issuing billions in bonds. A reporter from The New Yorker stops by to discuss her story about how a nursing home's quality of care went downhill after a private equity firm purchased the place.
From the BBC World Service: How high will the European Central Bank hike interest rates to tackle soaring prices? The Australian parliament in Canberra has passed the country's first major climate bill in more than a decade, setting legally binding targets to further curb emissions. In Nigeria there's concern that …
No more people under the age of 35 in Juul ads, social media or product placement – it's all a part of massive tentative settlement for the e-cigarette maker. Susan Schmidt of Exchange Capital Resources drops some market insight for us. There's a different side of the supply chain saga …
Oil prices are now at a seven-month low, and a lot has happened in those seven months. Plus, Californians have been asked not to charge EVs during peak hours. And, what's the "joint employer" rule? Something that helps tip labor regulations back toward workers.
From the BBC World Service: Russia and the West have already faced off on energy supplies, now Putin alleges grain exports from Ukraine are not going to the world's poorest countries. Plus, how India's silicon valley has been pounded by the heaviest rains in decades with power cuts and worries …
First, where markets are starting out after the Labor Day holiday, on the heels of several consecutive down weeks for stocks. Michael Schumacher of Wells Fargo Securities discusses how money is shifting in various ways. Plus, back-to-school shopping is not immune from inflation. And, Marketplace's China correspondent Jennifer Pak checks …
A blistering heatwave is expected to strain California's power grid. There was supposed to be a water conservation plan for the Colorado River by now, but it hasn't happened yet. We try to follow where money goes when Texas puts migrants on buses to sanctuary cities.
From the BBC World Service: The government of Southeast Asia's largest economy has increased fuel prices for the first time in eight years. Plus, Europe's energy crisis is a result of Russia's decision to use energy as a weapon. That's the accusation from Finnish energy company Fortnum Group. We hear …
President Biden kicks off the fall campaign season today. While student loan forgiveness will take up much of the discussion, there are also other changes coming, especially when it comes to unpaid interest. We check with the BBC's Victoria Craig regarding the announcement of Liz Truss as Britain's next prime …
From the BBC World Service: We broadcast from Westminster outside the Houses of Parliament in London as the U.K. waits to find out more about who will replace Boris Johnson as the next British Prime Minister. For analysis, we are joined by Shanti Keleman, Chief Investment Officer at M&G Wealth …
As Labor Day weekend wraps up, a snapshot of the upcoming fall season of air travel reveals that some of the frustrations from the summer will carry over, but crowds might thin out. We discuss how lockdowns in China are forcing companies to rethink their global diversification efforts.
Jobs Day numbers are here, and so is Julia Coronado of MacroPolicy Perspectives to discuss them. We also talk about the variety of factors that have led to the homelessness situation in New York.
Union organizers at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island have scored a legal victory. An aging water infrastructure is the culprit behind a troubling water shortage in the Mississippi capital of Jackson. The BBC checks in from Portugal, where new tech awaits the axe wielders who take part in the …
From the BBC World Service: Record-breaking floods across Pakistan are estimated to have washed away 45% of the nation's croplands and with resources on the ground in short supply, delivering aid is a mammoth task. Australia's government is moving quickly to try to address a chronic worker shortage that's left …
First, Diane Swonk of KPMG joins us for today's talk about what the markets are doing in the wake of new unemployment data. The Biden administration's restrictions on computer chip sales to China and Russia have put a Silicon Valley chipmaker in a bind. The BBC reports on how the …
But first, Oxfam America put together a list of the best (and worst) states for workers to live in, and there are a few things that link the worst states together. We talk to senior economics contributor Chris Farrell about the economic lessons one can take from the Rolling Stones.