Nature Podcast

by podcast@nature.com · · · · 211 subscribers

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature 's journalists and editors.


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More that 3 billions doses of China's CoronaVac and Sinopharm vaccines have been administered across the globe, playing an especially important role in Latin America and South East Asia, as well as China. These vaccines use inactivated virus parti...
The unexpected origins of a 4000-year-old people, protecting your ‘digital presence’ and what to expect from COP26.
People that have recovered from COVID are seeing stronger immune responses after vaccination than those that never contracted the virus. Researchers are now racing to unpick what is behind this powerful 'hybrid immunity'. In this episode of...
An ancient solar storm helps pinpoint when Vikings lived in the Americas, and using magnets to deftly move non-magnetic metals.
Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse ...
The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria.
New data suggests that inexpensive, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters can effectively scrub SARS-CoV-2 particles from the air in hospital COVID wards. The result validates previous studies carried out in controlled conditions. Currently, H...
AI weather forecasters, mapping the human brain and the 2021 science Nobel prizes.
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of two as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground.
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of two as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground.
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of two as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground.
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of two as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground.
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of two as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground.
Australian scientists are developing new technologies to help protect coral from climate change.
Less than 1% of those in low income countries are fully vaccinated, and that number only rises to 10% in low-middle income countries. Meanwhile more than half of the population in wealthier countries have received a double dose with several now rolling...
How tiny seed-like sensors could monitor the environment, and the latest from the Nature Briefing.
How aquatic foods could help tackle world hunger, and how Australian wildfires spurred phytoplankton growth in the Southern Ocean.
A new theory to explain missing geological time, the end of leaded petrol, and the ancient humans of Arabia.
How insects help release carbon stored in forests, and the upcoming biodiversity summit COP 15.
As women’s soccer, rugby and other sports gain in popularity a growing body of evidence suggests that female athletes are at a greater risk of traumatic brain injury than men - what's more they tend to fare worse after a concussion and take longer...