World Story of the Day : NPR

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At their joint news conference, President Putin said Russia and the U.S. can work together to alleviate suffering in Syria. Russia continues to attack civilian targets in support of the Syrian regime.

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NPR's Michel Martin recaps the World Cup final with Roger Bennett, host of the _Men in Blazers_ and _American Fiasco_ soccer podcasts.
On the eve of the World Cup Final, NPR's Michel Martin chats with former FIFA Referee Howard Webb about what it takes to referee one of the biggest sporting events in the world.
This is the first time the World Cup has used video replay to make official calls. Some say it has made for a cleaner game, but soccer purists claim it's ruined the event.
As Ethiopia and Eritrea declared peace, long-dead phone lines came alive. People spoke with relatives and strangers. "We will be family," an Eritrean told an Ethiopian who randomly dialed him.
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with _New York Times_ reporter Austin Ramzy about the aftermath of torrential rain in Japan that triggered floods and landslides, killing more than 170 people.
Tortured and imprisoned under Saddam Hussein's regime, composer and _oud_ player Rahim Alhaj — who resettled as a refugee in New Mexico — uses his work to tell true stories of Iraqis living through war.
British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson resigned Monday, potentially throwing Prime Minister Theresa May's government into disarray. George Parker of the _Financial Times_ analyzes the development _._
A neighborhood resident called 911 on Oregon state Rep. Janelle Bynum, who is a black woman, while she was canvassing. Bynum does not think legislation is the fix for reducing such police encounters.
Some users are turning to Buddhism and other religions to have a more mindful experience online. By being tethered to your devices, one monk says, "you will waste your whole precious time."
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to environmental toxicology professor Alastair Hay about the nerve agent that poisoned two people, four months after it poisoned a former Russian spy and his daughter.
The Trump administration says it will extend temporary protections for immigrants from Yemen for another 18 months because the country remains engulfed in a brutal Civil War.
Only two northern white rhinos remain, and they're both female. But researchers said Wednesday that they successfully have created embryos using sperm collected from the males before they died out.
The Lebanese government is encouraging departures, but the U.N. objects. "We are at the service of the refugees," says a Lebanese security official, "but we have reached the limit of our capability."
Elections are Sunday, and more than 3,000 women are running for office. "We women will continue to work three times as hard as men," says one candidate.
French Muslim rapper Médine is set to perform at the Bataclan, the Paris venue attacked by Islamist terrorists in 2015. Some politicians condemn it, but some survivors say censorship isn't the answer.
French Muslim rapper Médine is set to perform at the Bataclan, the Paris venue attacked by Islamist terrorists in 2015. Some politicians condemn it, but some survivors say censorship isn't the answer.
Vice President Pence is in Guatemala to meet with the leaders of three countries. His message to migrants: If you can't come to the United States legally, don't come at all.
"The brutality of American politics right now is something that is profoundly shocking to Canadians," says a former Trudeau adviser. "I think many people feel they do not recognize the U.S. anymore."
"I know for sure that if it was still Robert Mugabe, I would never dare to do it," says Savanna Madamombe. "The Mugabe era is gone, and it's something that can't ever be allowed to come back."