World Story of the Day : NPR

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NPR's top daily news about world events, politics, economy, and culture. Download the World Story of the Day podcast.

Washington's man in Beijing, Terry Branstad, says he goes way back with China's president.

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Professional skiers and resorts in Aspen face a problem this season: deal with patches of dirt caused by warmer temperatures or make the climate worse by making and moving artificial snow.
The town of Paracho is celebrating after its onetime resident helped design the guitar featured in the hit Disney-Pixar movie, and now it can't keep up with orders for the instrument.
He started as a mineworker and became a prominent anti-apartheid activist and a tycoon. Now he's leading the nation.
The ruling African National Congress party planned to recall him in a no- confidence vote on Thursday. Zuma resigned, saying the party should not be divided in his name.
Brazilians say carnival is about dropping your inhibitions and letting your emotions out. One large, extended family prepares an annual exercise that acts as a release valve for the pressures of life.
In Syria, the U.S. views Kurdish fighters as allies, but Turkey sees them as terrorists. The U.S. wants Turkey to limit its military offensive against the Kurds without harming U.S.-Turkey relations.
Michel Martin asks North Korea expert Jean Lee, former Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, and former COO for the U.S. Olympic Committee Lt. Gen. Wallace Gregson about behind-the-scenes diplomacy.
The Winter Olympics officially began Friday with opening ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Athletes from 92 countries marched into an open-air stadium to mark the start of the Olympiad.
NPR spoke to the director of U.N. relief operations in the West Bank about how he makes the case for America's continued assistance in the region.
Rohingya refugees from Myanmar are living in thousands of makeshift shelters on steep, sandy hills in Bangladesh. Humanitarian groups are afraid of what will happen when the monsoons come.
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks to Lucy Delap, historian at Cambridge University, about the 100th anniversary of the suffragette movement in Britain.
China has placed one or more acoustic sensors — listening devices — in the Mariana Trench, near the island of Guam, which is home to a major U.S. military base.
Jeanne Theoharis' new book re-examines civil rights history and the way it's been manipulated. "It is used to make us feel good about ourselves, to make us feel good about our progress," she says.
Jeanne Theoharis' new book re-examines civil rights history and the way it's been manipulated. "It is used to make us feel good about ourselves, to make us feel good about our progress," she says.
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Dan Reynolds, lead singer of Imagine Dragons, about his new documentary, _Believer_ , which takes a critical look at the Mormon Church's policies toward its LGBTQ members.
The technology provides them with an unprecedented view into how the ancient civilization worked and lived, revealing almost industrial agricultural infrastructure and new insights into warfare.
The administration's Nuclear Posture Review mentions a massive, nuclear-armed torpedo capable of incinerating cities. But is it real?
Many seafood lovers use the Monterey Bay Aquarium's ratings to choose sustainable fish. Now it has rolled out a tool to help corporations assess the risk of human trafficking in seafood supply chains.
The White House's withdrawal of Victor Cha as a candidate for ambassador to South Korea comes as an apparent result of differing views on the idea of using a preemptive strike against North Korea.