Open Source with Christopher Lydon

by Christopher Lydon · · · · 49 subscribers

Open Source is the world’s longest-running podcast. Christopher Lydon circles the big ideas in culture, the arts and politics with the smartest people in the world. It’s the kind of curious, critical, high-energy conversation we’re all missing nowadays. Be part of the action: leave a voice message to be played on the air; get in touch over Facebook or Twitter; or email us – info@radioopensource.org with show ideas, advice, requests and high-quality criticism.

The Egyptian graffiti genius known as Ganzeer is working on our turf now. I am presuming to welcome him as an artist of radical humanism. Four years ago in the Tahrir Square uprising in Cairo, ...

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Tags: culture, literature, interviews, arts, christopher lydon, world affairs, news

Older Episodes

After Attica March 6, 2015
We're revisiting the Attica prison revolt in 1971. It began as a civil rights protest and ended in a massacre when Governor Nelson Rockefeller ordered his state troopers to teargas the prisoners and open fire. In the story only now coming clear,
The English tenor and writer Ian Bostridge is happily and articulately fixed on a musical mountaintop: For 30 years he has been singing Franz Schubert’s deathbed song-cycle “Winterreise,” the "Winter Journey" of a desperate traveler toward madness and ...
Gridlocked Feb. 25, 2015
This week we’re talking about roads, rails and powerlines — and the lives we live with them. Our Boston staff and radio listeners are mostly hearty New Englanders, but this winter of discontent has exposed all kinds of shortcomings in the underpinnings...
Hacking the News Feb. 18, 2015
Last week before our show on violent extremism, we were talking over a big week in media news. We don't quite know what we'll do without Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert; we never had much use for Brian Williams or the latest iteration of The New Republ...
Roger Cohen’s memoir of his Lithuanian-Jewish-South African-English mother’s suicidal depression is an inquest into the damage of displacement that seeps into genes: the longing for home, the need to belong – “right up there with love and other fundame...
Next Wednesday the White House is convening a summit on 'countering violent extremism.' The details are sketchy — a press release announces that the meeting will "highlight domestic and international efforts to prevent violent extremists and their supp...
Depression, Inside-Out Feb. 9, 2015
Depression—characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or alienation—afflicts one of every 10 US adults. Our guest George Scialabba, a writer and public intellectual based in Cambridge, is speaking about his decades-long bout with th...
The Selma Moment Feb. 4, 2015
This week we're taking the measure of the mystery known as LBJ at the Selma moment: not the cinema bully caught dragging his heels in movie theaters this month in Ava DuVernay's Selma, but the real bully who brought us both the Voting Rights Bill and t...
We're continuing our "money machine" series on the cost of carbon capitalism. Gas gets cheaper, the weather gets warmer, and for our guests the environmental activists Naomi Klein and Bill McKibben, the choice is clear: change our ways,
Steve Brill is our guest. He’s an old-fashioned reporter at book length – out of the David Halberstam school. He’s taken apart the passage of Obamacare in an investigation he titled America’s Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Back-Room Deals,
On this Kickstarter-launch week we're diagnosing America’s healthcare woes with the meta-journalist and heart patient, Steve Brill. - In a new book he calls the Affordable Care Act "America's Bitter Pill",
Learning from Paris Jan. 13, 2015
The story of the massacre at Charlie Hebdo has gone everywhere in the past week: into meditations on free speech and blasphemy, into declarations of cultural and actual war, and high-wire geopolitics. - It's a fresh attack,
For the Delta to become the chief grower of the industrial world’s most important commodity – a kind of Saudi Arabia of the early 19th century – its land had to be taken from its original inhabitants; and labor, capital, knowledge,
Rediscovering Cuba Jan. 8, 2015
Starting last month, the American freeze-out of Communist Cuba, which long outlasted the Cold War, began to come to an end. It may have been a small thrill in a bleak political year, but take it as proof that everything — even chilly international grud...
Where is jazz headed in a new century? With the pianist Vijay Iyer as guide, newly tenured as a professor at Harvard, it tends toward the experimental, with drummers, young musicians and slam poets. If it doesn’t always swing,
Beethoven at the Piano Dec. 25, 2014
We're getting the Beethoven fundamentals, as never before, at my own piano. At a short safe distance from the keyboard, I’m learning, among other things: As volcanic was the man's painful life and descent into deafness,
The protests chanting "Black Lives Matter" and "I Can't Breathe" in the wake of the police killings in Missouri, New York, and elsewhere, will draw comparisons. They're less pious than the Civil Rights Movement and they have the same problem as Occupy:...
Our friend the linguist and psychologist Steven Pinker has written a manual on prose style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century, as he calls it. We asked Steve to bring along some samples of his favorite lines and paragraphs and ...
Boston Noir Dec. 8, 2014
Noir heroes tend not to be gangsters of Whitey Bulger’s grandeur; not tough cops either: they’re punched-out boxers and junkies, little perps, prisoners, victims reduced to victimizing each other and themselves.