Science Magazine Podcast

by Science Magazine · · · · 289 subscribers

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

As the year comes to a close, we review the best science, the best stories, and the best books from 2019. Our end-of-the-year episode kicks off with Host Sarah Crespi and Online News Editor David Grimm talking about the top online stories on things like human self-domestication, the “wood wide web,” and more. News Editor Tim Appenzeller joins Sarah to discuss Science’s 2019 Breakthrough of the Year, some of the contenders for breakthrough, also known as runners-up, and a breakdown—when science and politics just didn’t seem to mix this year. Finally, Science books editor Valerie Thompson brings her favorites from …

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Tags: science & medicine, education, technology, science

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On this week’s show: Tracing the roots of epilepsy, and watching lightning, terrestrial gamma ray bursts, and elves from the International Space Station
On this week’s show: A close look at retiring research monkeys, and observations of ejected material from a near-Earth asteroid
On this week’s show: A close look at retiring research monkeys, and observations of ejected material from a near-Earth asteroid
On this week’s show: An investigation into the National Institutes of Health’s largest school debt repayment program and turning telecommunication cables into earthquake detectors
On this week’s show: An investigation into the National Institutes of Health’s largest school debt repayment program and turning telecommunication cables into earthquake detectors
On this week’s show: A landslide laboratory in a national park in Taiwan, and a database of songs from around the world
On this week’s show: A landslide laboratory in a national park in Taiwan, and a database of songs from around the world
On this week’s show: How researchers studying the Arctic contend with contamination from their noisy, smoky, and bright research ship, and how fast- moving spikes on the Sun’s surface may be powering the tremendous heat of the solar atmosphere
On this week’s show: How researchers studying the Arctic contend with contamination from their noisy, smoky, and bright research ship, and how fast- moving spikes on the Sun’s surface may be powering the tremendous heat of the solar atmosphere
On this week’s show: Archaeologists are digging up buttons and beads in the Caribbean to better understand the lives of enslaved Africans, and economists are unraveling how the early Roman Catholic Church has influenced psychology today
On this week’s show: Archaeologists are digging up buttons and beads in the Caribbean to better understand the lives of enslaved Africans, and economists are unraveling how the early Roman Catholic Church has influenced psychology today
On this week’s show: How the measles virus induces immune amnesia, making later infections with other diseases more likely, and detecting a small black hole in a binary pair with a red giant star
On this week’s show: How the measles virus induces immune amnesia, making later infections with other diseases more likely, and detecting a small black hole in a binary pair with a red giant star
On this week’s show: Digging into global earthworm populations, detecting bias in an algorithm used to make health care decisions, and a plea for space archaeology
On this week’s show: Digging into global earthworm populations, detecting bias in an algorithm used to make health care decisions, and a plea for space archaeology
On this week’s show: Uncovering the biological basis of consciousness, and understanding why adults think their generation was always “better”
On this week’s show: Uncovering the biological basis of consciousness, and understanding why adults think their generation was always “better”
On this week’s show: New insights into dinosaurs from 300-million-year-old molecules, and stretching rubber bands and twisting memory metals to cool things down
On this week’s show: New insights into dinosaurs from 300-million-year-old molecules, and stretching rubber bands and twisting memory metals to cool things down