Economist Radio

by The Economist · · · · 120 subscribers

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He won a landslide victory campaigning on it, but like French presidents before him Emmanuel Macron is struggling to push through his grand pension reform; we ask why. The belief in guardian spirits in Myanmar is being cracked down on by increasingly intolerant monks. And the Canadian town of Asbestos considers a name-change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

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Older Episodes

Babbage: Fire fighting Jan. 8, 2020
Australia is battling catastrophic wildfires. Climate models predict extreme fire events are going to become more commonplace. What can countries do to prepare? And, a glimpse into the chip factory around which the modern world turns. Also, wh...
Attacks on bases that house American troops seem a dramatic retaliation to the killing of Iranian commander Qassem Suleimani—yet both sides seem to be tuning their tactics toward de-escalation. After nearly a year without one, Spain has a government. B...
Oil and gold prices spiked after the killing of Qassem Suleimani, an Iranian general, by the United States. How might heightened tension in the Middle East affect these important commodity markets in the weeks ahead? And, at the American Economic Assoc...
After chaotic scenes in the National Assembly, it seems the country’s legislature has two leaders. Has Juan Guaidó’s chance at regime change run out of steam? Allegations against Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement; as he stands trial in New Y...
Killing Iran’s top military commander does not seem likely to further America’s aims for the region. What should America and its allies expect now? Biologists have long struggled to explain why homosexual behaviour is so widespread in nature, but a new...
What can Britain today learn from Walter Bagehot? He was The Economist’s greatest editor who mixed with the cream of British society in the 19th century. The Economist’s current Bagehot columnist, Adrian Wooldridge, talks to James Grant, financial jour...
It is increasingly clear that putting less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will not be enough to combat climate change; we take a look at the effort to actively remove the stuff from the air. Our correspondent takes a ride on Chicago’s Red Line, whose...
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, don’t be fooled by the phase one trade deal between China and America. (10:20) Finding new physics requires a new particle collider. (30:52) And, a di...
No longer content just to assemble devices, Chinese firms want to design them and the infrastructure around them—and in some sectors they look set to succeed. Our correspondent visits indigenous communities along the icy sliver of water between Russia ...
Kenneth Cukier celebrates the invention of a musical instrument that turns 100 in 2020—the Theremin. A staple of sci-fi sound-effects, the instrument is enjoying a revival in the digital age. We talk to players, historians, a former student and relativ...
The office is evolving beyond recognition. How did a functional grid of desks become more like a home, complete with in-house childcare and spare exercise clothes? James Fransham, a data journalist at The Economist, takes a tour of some of the world’s ...
2020 will be a key year for determining how big multinational and technology companies are taxed, but can a global deal be reached? Also, to what degree will the Olympics boost Japan’s international standing next year and will a new event called sport ...
In 2019 Anne McElvoy challenged the people making the news. From presidential candidates and CEOs to fashion icons and even a relationship therapist. Among her guests were Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg, editor-in-chief of Vogue, Anna Wintour and...
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week, visiting the most diverse district in Africa, (17:30) meeting the Cockneys of Thetford, (34:22) and the tangled history of California’s euca...
From pickled radishes to red knickers, we take a break from the news of the moment to look back over the peaks and troughs of the past year in business, finance and economics. Our merry panel of Helen Joyce, The Economist’s finance editor, Patrick Foul...
Death sentences are occasionally overturned in America; we meet a private detective responsible for saving many of those lives. We scour our foreign department taking nominations for The Economist’s country of the year. And our correspondent joins a sh...
Lies and politics have always come as a pair, but the untruths keep getting bigger and more frequent; our correspondent digs into why. We speak with an adventurer who fought off the murderous boredom of a whole Antarctic winter with little more than bo...
Every generation has its own “Little Women”. Anne McElvoy asks Greta Gerwig, the Oscar-nominated writer and director of “Lady Bird”, about how she reinvented the classic story of Jo, Amy, Meg and Beth March for a new audience. They talk about her move ...
Next year, China’s median age will surpass America’s, but with just a quarter the median income; the government is nervous that China will get old before it gets rich. This weekend’s elections in Uzbekistan are another sign of astonishing change in the...