Tommy Dorsey: The Sentimental Gentleman of Swing Feb. 23, 2012

from The Palomar· ·

by George Spink "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (Theme Song) by Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra (circa 1941) Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra (circa 1941) 1. I'll See You In My Dreams Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard 11. Embraceable You ** Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 2. Street Of Dreams Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 12. For You Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 3. *_I'll Never Smile Again_ *Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 13. Manhattan Serenade Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 4. On The Sunnyside Of The Street** Tommy Dorsey, The Sentimentalists ...



by George Spink "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (Theme Song) by Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra (circa 1941) 1. I'll See You In My Dreams Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard 11. Embraceable You Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 2. Street Of Dreams Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 12. For You Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 3. I'll Never Smile Again Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 13. Manhattan Serenade Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford 4. On The Sunnyside Of The Street Tommy Dorsey, The Sentimentalists 14. Let's Get Away From It All Tommy Dorsey, Jo Stafford, et. al. 5. Swingin' On Nothin' Tommy Dorsey, Sy Oliver, Jo Stafford 15. But She's My Buddy Chick Tommy Dorsey with Charlie Shavers 6. There Are Such Things Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 16. Friendship The Dorsey Family (Mountain Division) 7. Hawaiian War Chant Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra 17. How About You? Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra 8. Annie's Cousin Fanny The Dorsey Brothers 18. I Guess I'll Have To Dream The Rest Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, et. al. 9. Yes, Indeed! Tommy Dorsey, Sy Oliver, Jo Stafford 19. Lonesome Road Tommy Dorsey with His Orchestra 10. Dolores Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, Pipers 20. Marie Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey grew up in the coal mining area of Shenandoah, Pa. Their father worked in the mines, taught music, and led the local band. He taught Jimmy and Tommy how to play cornet, then taught Jimmy alto saxophone and Tommy trombone. Their father taught them very well. The Dorsey boys became excellent musicians. Like other brothers, the Dorseys often fought. Jimmy, the timid one, could tee off Tommy with a simple statement or question. On May 30, 1935, the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra was playing at the prestigious Glen Island Casino. This was a band that their friend Glenn Miller helped them to assemble. Miller did most of the band's arrangements and also played trombone. Tommy, who was conducting, beat off the tempo for "I'll Never Say Never Again." Jimmy, playing in the sax section, called out, "Isn't that a little too fast, Mac? Let's do it right or not at all." "All right!" Tommy shouted! "We won't do it at all!" Tommy turned and walked off the stage. The Dorsey brothers went their separate ways until 1953. During the next decade, Tommy outscored Jimmy hit for hit, dollar for dollar, but both did very well. Tommy had a strong business sense, which enabled him to live very comfortably. His Long Island mansion even had a 50 -foot-long Lionel train layout in the basement—something Frank Sinatra really admired. Years later, Sinatra built one that surpassed Tommy's on his estate in Rancho Mirage, Calif., in a specially designed building resembling the train station in Ramsey, N.J. Sinatra modeled it not on Tommy's but on the larger layout in the Lionel Trains showroom in New York City circa 1949. Tommy's acute business sense dovetailed nicely with his musical genius. He insisted on top talent for his band. Looking back, you'll find more than 50 jazz legends passed through his band during the decade of 1935-1945, the Swing Era. Just as Tommy knew how to present his instrumentalists, he knew how to showcase his vocalists. For example, listen to any of his songs with Jo Stafford and The Pied Pipers, or Frank Sinatra, together or solo, and you'll see how very well Tommy provided a terrific musical backdrop for them. Tommy's acute business sense dovetailed nicely with his musical genius. He insisted on top talent for his band. Looking back, you'll find more than 50 jazz legends passed through his band during the decade of 1935-1945, the Swing Era. Just as Tommy knew how to present his instrumentalists, he knew how to showcase his vocalists. For example, listen to any of his songs with Jo Stafford and The Pied Pipers, or Frank Sinatra, together or solo, and you'll see how very well Tommy provided a terrific musical backdrop for them. There is a story trumpet