Economic discrimination and African American poverty July 10, 2020

from World Business Report· ·

We have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Brian Rice bought several buildings in Ensley in Birmingham, Alabama, but tells us he was refused credit to redevelop the property. Andre Perry is author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America's Black Cities, and argues that deliberate devaluation of black assets is a major factor holding those communities back. And Sekou Kaalund, head of bank JP Morgan Chase's Advancing Black Pathways programme explains how the bank hopes it may be able to help improve the situation. Also in the programme, the countries …



We have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Brian Rice bought several buildings in Ensley in Birmingham, Alabama, but tells us he was refused credit to redevelop the property. Andre Perry is author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America's Black Cities, and argues that deliberate devaluation of black assets is a major factor holding those communities back. And Sekou Kaalund, head of bank JP Morgan Chase's Advancing Black Pathways programme explains how the bank hopes it may be able to help improve the situation. Also in the programme, the countries of the European Union are struggling to agree on how to pay for a plan to limit the economic damage caused by coronavirus. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker brings us the details of the disagreement, and Anne Mulder, member of parliament for the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy in the Netherlands discusses his country's reticence to get on board with the proposed bailout. Nominations closed this week for the next head of the World Trade Organisation, and one candidate, Kenyan lawyer and politician Amina Mohamed, tells us what attracted her to the job. Plus, as Barbados reopens to international travel this weekend, the prime minister of the island nation Mia Amor Mottley explains why they have chosen to offer international visitors the chance to work remotely from the island for up to a year. (Picture: A mural in downtown Ensley, in Birmingham, Alabama. Picture credit: Brian Rice.)