More or Less: Behind the Stats

by BBC · · · · 503 subscribers

Tim Harford and the More or Less team try to make sense of the statistics which surround us. From BBC Radio 4

Ahead of the opening of the new season of the English Premier League, baseless rumours and dodgy statistics circulating online have implied that Liverpool FC use asthma medication to enhance their players’ performance. Ben Carter speaks to sports scientist Professor John Dickinson to examine the science that disproves these rumour, and tracks down its original source with the help of Mike Wendling from the World Service's Trending programme. Presenter: Ben Carter Producer: Richard Vadon

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Tags: bbc, the undercover economist, science & medicine, education, andrew dilnot, news & politics, news, statistics, statistique, stistics, data

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