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What's behind Russia's apparent hacking into the Democratic National Committee — and what could it gain by meddling in the U.S. election? "It's all about Hillary Clinton," says a Russian journalist.

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The ride-hailing company expects to include a human in case something goes wrong, but the driverless vehicles would be the first available for commercial use. They could be on the road in a few weeks.
Why are we parting with BlackBerry Classic and VCR — but not fax or QWERTY keyboard? We ask you to nominate outdated tech for phase-out and visit Tekserve, the closing cult Mac store in Manhattan.
Zeinab al-Ashry founded the popular Facebook group, "Confessions of a Married Woman." University of California Riverside professor Sherine Hafez talks to Rachel Martin about an online trend in Egypt.
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with economics professor Alan Krueger of Princeton University about how people participate in the gig economy — particularly as Uber drivers — to supplement their incomes.
The city of Berlin just banned Airbnb because it was swallowing up long-term rentals and driving up prices. Paris is now struggling to temper the explosion of the rental site for the same reasons.
After acquiring Yahoo, Verizon ranks third in digital advertising and is a major player in media and tech. It wants to play in the Silicon Valley sandbox — but don't expect a full transformation yet.
Back in the early '60s a computer dating service decided these two people were compatible. That calculation was right. John and Carol Matlock will celebrate 52 years of marriage in December.
Summer sleep-away camps say it's getting harder to enforce cell phone bans, and millennials say it's tough going cold turkey. But they all say it's more important than ever to learn how to unplug.
The government keeps track of who is alive and who is dead. But there can be errors. And when you're mistakenly ruled dead, it can be remarkably tough to convince people you're still among the living.
Delta's massive outage wasn't the first malfunction to wreak havoc on an airline. The industry's systems are complex and require high security, which can make them more prone to shutdowns.
Teens showed an image that was deemed to have lots of "likes" tended to also like the image. Seeing popular pictures also produced greater activation in the reward centers of the brain.
Since the late 1990s, oil traders have used Yahoo Messenger as their main communication tool. The new version, however, does not meet the industry's standards for compliance.
Verizon has transformed from a child of the Bell monopoly to parent of tech legends AOL and Yahoo. It wants to play with Google and Facebook — but don't expect a full transformation just yet.
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Peter Hollens, an a cappella singer who regularly releases new music on his YouTube channel, about how the proliferation of music online could be a plus for artists.
It's an ongoing standoff between musicians and Google's YouTube: Who should be responsible for removing unauthorized copies of songs posted online?
More than ever before, U.S. elections are a business opportunity. Social media companies are capitalizing on attention spent on the candidates.
As the last VCR factory in Japan closes down production, we take a look at the rise and fall of the videocassette recorder and the culture it created.
A new bar in Sussex has lined its walls with foil to block phone signals. The owner, inspired by the Faraday cage, hopes people will talk to each other rather than stare at their smartphones.
Not everyone outside staring into their phones is searching for Pokémon — some people are looking for actual wildlife. The app iNaturalist is bringing together urban biologists and curious citizens.