Planet Money

by NPR (podcasts@npr.org) · · · · 1555 subscribers

The economy explained. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening.

Investors can fund lawsuits for profit, which gives more people access to the courts. But some worry it will warp the justice system. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

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Older Episodes

#941: Three Bets Sept. 28, 2019
Planet Money takes a gamble on three stories about bets gone... every which way.
One of the most dramatic things to happen in economics in the last few years was when India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi decided to suddenly "demonetize" the country.
Interest rates are low and getting lower. Some are even negative. Which means we live in a weird world, where people are lending out money and getting back less.
#658: Strike One Sept. 18, 2019
An automakers' strike against General Motors in the 1930s changed the world of unions forever. Before, striking was dangerous and illegal. Today, it's a fairly civilized business.
In the 1970s, Studs Terkel interviewed scores of people about their jobs for his book Working. Today, we hear a few of those conversations — and follow up with the subjects.
Behind popular music, there is this hidden economy of music producers buying and selling sonic snippets, texting each other half-finished beats, and angling for back-end royalties.
#938: The Marshall Plan Sept. 7, 2019
Sometimes to help yourself, you help your enemy. After WWII, the U.S. launched what might be the most successful intervention in history, rebuilding Germany and more.
Imagine being the company that makes all the world's dollar bills. We found that company and took a look inside.
In the 1990s, the government ran an experiment to test the economic impact of moving people to lower-poverty neighborhoods. The results surprised them.
#936: The Modal American Aug. 29, 2019
Who is the average American? Bad question. You end up with a clumpy amalgamation of qualities. If you want to know how real people are living, you want the Modal American.
How to get the best value from the salad bar? Why do Americans refrigerate their eggs? What's the deal with Choco Pies? It's the food edition of listener questions.
A 13-year-old listener wrote in asking if the inverted yield curve means that a recession is on the way. Today on the show, we try to answer him.
#933: Find The Helium Aug. 16, 2019
You need helium to launch rockets into space. It's also essential for MRI machines and cellphones. But the world is running short on helium. So we're going looking for more.
Solar energy used to be a fantasy. Then it arrived, but was too expensive for most people to afford. Now it's cheap. Here's how it happened.
Counting elephants is key to saving them. But in the rainforest, they're hard to spot. One scientist is listening for them instead, with the help of artificial intelligence.
Felipe was an IT professional looking for a new gig. Then a notorious con artist offered him a job. Felipe took the job — and tried to con the con man.
#930: Twins Aug. 3, 2019
Scientists have been studying twins for a long time, trying to figure out how much of human behavior is influenced by the environment, and how much of it is in our genes.
We shorted America, taking a bet against its entire stock market. Today, we find out the results, and revisit the very first person to short a stock back in the 17th century.
Today on the show, we ignore the advice of some very smart people and bet against something people love.